How to Convert Guitar Chords to Piano with TABS [Step-by-Step Tutorial]

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Curious about how to convert guitar chords to piano? We can’t let guitarists have all the fun playing classics like “Stairway to Heaven” and “Hotel California”!

Just because a song is written in tabs doesn’t mean that piano players can’t read it too. In this article, we’ll show you how to translate guitar chords to piano using tabs.

Convert Guitar Chords to Piano Chords Using Tabs

First, let’s establish a basic understanding of the guitar. The notes of the open strings from thickest to thinnest are E, A, D, G, B, and E. Also, each fret on the guitar is a half step.

This means that you can find any note by starting from the open string that the note is played on and counting up in half steps, one fret at a time, until you arrive at the desired note.

In this tutorial, we’ll be using tabs to convert the guitar chords to piano. What you need to know about tabs is that there are six lines that represent the six guitar strings. The bottom line represents the thickest string, while the top represents the thinnest.

The numbers you’ll see on each line indicate the number of the fret that is played on that string. As far as reading rhythms, tabs usually only approximate rhythms. But as you read the fret numbers from left to right, more or less spaces between numbers indicate note values and rests.

So, more space between two numbers means that you’ll either hold the note or rest until the next one is played. If numbers are stacked on top of each other vertically, that means those notes are played at the same time.

Alright piano players, let’s finally sink our teeth into one of the most wonderfully cliché, guitar-based songs ever made- “Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin. Take a look at the video below that provides the tabs.

Now it’s time to figure out the right piano notes, and from there the appropriate piano chords to play!

We’ll just focus on the first measure for now. To find the first note, we look at which string it’s played on. The number 7 is on the third line from the bottom, which indicates the D string.

Since the fret number is 7, we’re going to count up 7 half steps from the open D string. Feel free to use your piano to help you do this. When we count up we get these notes: D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A. So, A is the first note.

Next, let’s look at the second note. It’s played on the third thinnest string, which is a G. Since the number is 5, we count up 5 half steps from the open G string, giving us these notes: G, G#, A, A#, B, C. So, our second note is C. Keep using this process to find the next notes.

When we get to beat 3 of this measure, there is a 7 and a 6 stacked on top of each other. This means that both notes are played at the same time. The 7 is on the thinnest string, E, while the 6 is on the third from the bottom string – D.

Starting with the thinnest string, E, let’s count up 7 half steps: E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B. Now, count up 6 half steps from D: D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#. So you’ll play B and G# at the same time.

In a nutshell, that’s the basic idea for translating guitar chords to piano using tabs. With this method of counting up in half steps from an open string, you can effectively steal all the guitarists’ favorite songs!

AndyWAndy W. teaches guitar, piano, singing, and more in Greeley, CO. He specializes in jazz, and has played guitar for 12 years. Learn more about Andy here!

 

 

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7 replies
  1. Helen
    Helen says:

    Wow, thank you! This is an awesome explanation of guitar tab on the piano. I am very jealous of guitar players because I can only do a few chords and very basic, slow guitar tab. I know it just takes practice, but I don’t seem to have enough diligence. I didn’t have a choice with piano; I was forced through 11 years of lessons. Still, I love the piano and I would love to take my favorite guitar songs and translate them over to the keys.

    Reply
  2. Yve
    Yve says:

    Hi Andy,

    Is there any way you could help me transcribe the song:
    When I get my Hands on You- by: The New Basement Tapes
    ???
    I appreciate your explanation, but am finding myself really struggling with this process.
    Thank you for your consideration!

    Reply

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