imperfect spanish conjugation

Part V: Conjugating Future & Conditional Tenses in Spanish

How to Conjugate Spanish Verbs - Future & Conditional

What do you know about future and conditional tense? Spanish learners should know how to conjugate these tenses so you can talk about upcoming events! Spanish tutor Jason N. teaches you here…

 

Conjugation is one of the most fundamental parts of learning Spanish. As we get to this last post on conjugation, you will already have a nice base for patterns and formulas. This post is the grand finale, part V of my series about conjugating verbs in Spanish.

By now, you have come a long way. Remember, this learning is best taught chronologically, so before you tackle this post you should review the previous posts:

This particular post is about the future tense and the conditional tense in Spanish. The conditional tense describes what you would like to do given certain conditions, and the future tense describes events that will happen in the future.

For example, the following sentences would use the conditional tense:

  • I would go to the game. (Iría al partido)
  • They would see the movie. (Verían la película)

Alternately, these sentences would use the future tense:

  • I will go to the game. (Iré al partido)
  • They will see the movie. (Verán la película)

Identical to others tenses, the Spanish conditional and future tenses break down verbs into five different ending variants. By now you have probably mastered how it works. All we need to do now is learn another new formula.

The conditional tense is strikingly similar to the imperfect. The key difference is that in the conditional tense, we don’t shave off the -ar, -ir, or -er verb ending first — but the conjugation ending is the same! As we have used the example of the verb mirar (to watch) in the previous articles, let’s continue with that.

How to Conjugate -ar Verbs in Conditional Tense

– DON’T shave off the ending -ar; leave it alone!
– If you are referring to ‘yo’ or ‘I,’ add the ending ‘ía’ to end the infinitive verb, forming miraría.
– If you are referring to ‘tú’ or ‘you,’ add the ending ‘ía,’ to form mirarías.
– If you are referring to ‘él’ or ‘ella” or ‘he or she,’ use the ending ‘ía’ to form miraría*.
*Yes this is the same as the ‘yo’ form, just like the imperfect!
– If you are referring to ‘nosotros’ or ‘we,’ use the ending ‘íamos’ to form miraríamos.
– If you are referring to ‘ellos’ or ‘they,’ use the ending ‘ían,’ to form mirarían.

What about -er verbs? Let’s use comer (to eat) as an example again:

How to Conjugate -er Verbs in Conditional Tense

– DON’T shave off the ending -er
– Same as -ar verbs to form comería.
– Same as -ar verbs to form comerías.
-If you are referring to ‘él’ or ‘ella” or ‘he or she,’ same as -ar verbs to form comería*.
*Yes this is the same as the ‘yo’ form as well!
-If you are referring to ‘nosotros’ or ‘we,’ Same as -ar verbs to form comeríamos.
-If you are referring to ‘ellos’ or ‘they,’ same as -ar verbs to form comerían.

How to Conjugate -ir Verbs in Conditional Tense

Same rules as with -ar and -er verbs

See the following charts of key conditional tense verb conjugations:

Mirar (to watch):
Yo miraría
Tú mirarías
Él/Ella/Usted miraría
Nosotros miraríamos
Ellas/Ellos/Ustedes mirarían

Comer (to eat):
Yo comería
Tú comerías
Él/Ella/Usted comería
Nosotros comeríamos
Ellas/Ellos/Ustedes comerían

Vivir (to live):
Yo viviría
Tú vivirías
Él/Ella/Usted viviría
Nosotros viviríamos
Ellas/Ellos/Ustedes vivirían

Ready for some practice? Conjugate the following conditional tense Spanish words:

Spanish Conjugation Chart

Moving on, the future tense does have many irregulars but in this post I just wanted to you get the basic idea. The future tense is similar to the conditional in that you add the ending to the given verb in its infinitive form. Let’s continue with mirar:

How to Conjugate -ar Verbs in the Future Tense

– DON’T shave off the ending -ar; leave it alone!
– If you are referring to ‘yo’ or ‘I,’ add the ending ‘é’ to end the infinitive verb, forming miraré.
– If you are referring to ‘tú’ or ‘you,’ add the ending ‘ás,’ to form mirarás.
– If you are referring to ‘él’ or ‘ella” or ‘he or she,’ use the ending ‘á’ to form mirará.
– If you are referring to ‘nosotros’ or ‘we,’ use the ending ‘emos’ to form miraremos.
– If you are referring to ‘ellos’ or ‘they,’ use the ending ‘án,’ to form mirarán.

What about ER verbs? Let’s use comer (to eat), for example:

How to Conjugate -er Verbs in the Future Tense

– DON’T shave off the ending -er
-Same as -ar verbs to form comeré.
-Same as -ar verbs to form comerás.
-If you are referring to ‘él’ or ‘ella” or ‘he or she,’ same as -ar verbs to form comerá.
-If you are referring to ‘nosotros’ or ‘we,’ same as -ar verbs to form comeremos.
-If you are referring to ‘ellos’ or ‘they,’ same as -ar verbs to form comerán.

How to Conjugate -ir Verbs in the Future Tense

Same rules as with -ar and -er verbs

See the following examples of key Future verb conjugations:

Mirar:
Yo miraré
Tú mirarás
Él/Ella/Usted mirará
Nosotros miraremos
Ellas/Ellos/Ustedes mirarán

Comer:
Yo comeré
Tú comerás
Él/Ella/Usted comerá
Nosotros comeremos
Ellas/Ellos/Ustedes comerán

Vivir:
Yo viviré
Tú vivirás
Él/Ella/Usted vivirá
Nosotros viviremos
Ellas/Ellos/Ustedes vivirán

Ready for some practice? Conjugate the following in the future tense:

Spanish Conjugation Chart

The good news is that the future and conditional tenses have the same irregulars! While I won’t go into a lot detail here about the irregulars, here’s some common ones in which their stem changes:

Poner → Pondr forming Pondré instead of Poneré in its future ‘yo’ form
Salir → Saldr forming Saldré instead of Saliré in its future ‘yo’ form

Need more help? Contact your Spanish tutor with more questions about irregular conditional and future tense conjugations!

JasonNPost Author: Jason N.
Jason N. tutors in English and Spanish in Fairfax, CA. He majored in Spanish at UC Davis, lived in Mexico for 3 years where he completed a Master’s degree in Counseling, and studied Spanish Literature and Psychology at the University of Costa Rica. Learn more about Jason here!

 

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