12 Best Piano Brands for Every Kind of Pianist (w/Sound Clips!)

Best Piano Brands

When you’re in the market for a piano, the possibilities of piano brands can seem endless. Yamaha or Kawai? Digital or acoustic?

If you want to end up with the perfect piano for your budget, skill level, and musical goals, this guide is a great place to start. Any one of these 12 popular piano brands will offer you an excellent choice.

The 12 Best Piano Brands for All Pianists

Yamaha


This Japanese brand is recognized worldwide for its excellence and versatility. They build sturdy, high quality pianos and offer good digital options, as well. Their pianos are known for having a signature bright sound, yet there is still a roundness to the sound.

Yamaha is an innovative brand that is constantly improving and creating new models to meet a variety of needs. One of the coolest features you can find on a Yamaha piano is its silent piano option. The feature allows you to play an acoustic piano but hear the sound through headphones, so you can practice at any hour without disturbing others.

Many well-known musicians endorse Yamaha including Alicia Keys, Elton John, and Chick Corea. Its U1, and slightly larger U3, upright models are well-loved acoustic pianos that stand the test of time. Its CLP series is a popular digital option.

Yamaha also sells concert grand pianos. Their prices are fair for the quality, and they are a reasonable option for anyone looking for an upright piano.

Steinway & Sons

Quality and history come together to form Steinway & Sons, a favorite piano maker of many musicians. A German immigrant in New York City started Steinway, and it remains there today.

Steinway is a classical pianist’s dream. Many famous pianists endorse the brand including Lang Lang, Mitsuko Uchida, and Martha Argerich. Steinway offers different sizes of grand pianos, which are often selected based on the size of the concert hall they are used in.

Due to its long history, you can find many vintage Steinways for sale. Steinway’s grand pianos are their most well-known models, but their price range makes them a better choice for the most dedicated and serious pianists.

Luckily, they’ve also created two lines of pianos for those with a more limited budget: the Essex (entry level) and the Boston (mid-level).

Kawai

Kawai is another one of the Japanese piano brands that offers pianos at a reasonable price range. They are durable, well-made pianos with several unique features, including longer keys for increased technical ease and the use of different materials in their construction, like plastic and composite.

Their digital pianos were the first to be built with wood keys, offering the experience of an acoustic piano’s keys. Kawai upright pianos and digital pianos are good options for intermediate pianists who want a fairly priced, durable option. Artists playing Kawai pianos include Joe Yamada and Steven Curtis Chapman.

Bösendorfer

If you care about tradition and history when shopping for piano brands, you will value Bösendorfer. Established in 1828, the pianos have a rich and luscious sound. One innovation is the addition of keys beyond the typical 88.

This piano maker is best for connoisseurs and serious pianists who are ready to invest in a well-crafted piano, as their pianos are among the most expensive in the world. Their grand pianos are the bulk of their production, with a few upright pianos offered as well.

Artists who love Bösendorfer pianos include Kimiko Ishizaka, Beatrice Berrut, and Saskia Giorgini.

Fazioli

This northern Italian piano maker creates only the finest grand pianos. Its various models include creations made from unique materials like red elm, ebony, and even gold leaf.

Fazioli pianos are truly works of art, and their price range is very high for this reason. While it’s a relatively young piano brand (started in the late 1970s), Paolo Fazioli’s dedication to his craft quickly established his reputation in the piano world.

Herbie Hancock, Matteo Fossi, and Lucas Wong all treasure Fazioli pianos. This piano brand is perfect for a serious pianist who is ready to invest in a piano for life. 

C. Bechstein

Bechstein pianos have a long history, with endorsements from composers like Franz Liszt and Claude Debussy creating a worldwide demand. Vassily Primakov, Kit Armstrong, and Michael Dalberto are all well-known pianists who enjoy playing these gorgeous and elegant pianos.

The German pianos are ideal for concert hall performances as well as recording studio work. There is also a line of high quality upright pianos. The price range of the Concert pianos is high, but Bechstein has created three other piano brands to suit a variety of needs.

Beginners can explore the Zimmerman and W. Hoffman brands, while advanced players should look at the C. Bechstein Academy brand.

Blüthner

Blüthner is a Leipzig-based, German brand that achieved acclaim in the time of composers like Brahms, Mahler, and Wagner. It also grew in popularity with The Beatles’ music.

These pianos have stood the test of time. Blüthner currently makes a wide variety of models including uprights and grands. Many artists are fans of Blüthner pianos, including Rima Chacaturian, Billy Childs, and Ying Feng.

Blüthner pianos are best for those who value tradition and creativity. The pianos create a memorable sound and are long-lasting. Known as the piano with the “golden tone,” the price tag reflects the quality of the brand.

Mason & Hamlin


This Massachusetts-based brand is a stalwart in the industry, making several models of grand pianos and a professional upright model. Their pianos are especially well-built and made to last.

Mason & Hamlin made several innovations in the design of their pianos, including the crown retention system, used in the soundboard. These pianos are a good choice for anyone interested in purchasing a quality vintage piano.

The pianos are on par with Steinway in performance, and their price tag reflects this. Artists playing the timeless pianos include Brian Culbertson, Jarrod Radnich, and Rod Tanski.

Stuart & Sons


Want to have your own custom-built piano? Australian brand Stuart & Sons builds pianos with high-quality materials and excellent craftsmanship. Custom orders can be placed directly with the piano makers.

The pianos come in concert grand and studio grand sizes, with either 97 keys or 102 keys. Choices of materials include Tasmanian Huon Pine and Tasmanian Sassafras. These pianos are unique works of art and as such, are best for those with a high budget who want a piano full of personality.

Artists playing Stuart & Sons pianos include Gregory Kinda and Fiona Joy Hawkins.

Casio


Casio is an electronic keyboard maker known for producing lightweight and compact keyboards that can go anywhere. Their price can’t be beat. The portable models are popular, but Casio also offers more advanced arranger keyboards and space-saving, discreet console pianos.

Their pianos offer many fun sounds that can transform your music making. This brand comes from Japan, and is popular with many singers, pop musicians, and stage performers. Rachel Sage, Larry Dunn, and Kyle Morrison all use Casio keyboards.

Casio keyboards are best for young beginner pianists, those with interests in rock, pop, or metal, and pianists who enjoy experimenting with unique sounds at the piano.

Korg


Korg is another one of the many Japanese piano brands that dominate this list. This modern, digital brand offers a wide range of models, from beginner to more complex. Korg is known for its technological advancements and their ability to produce a wide variety of piano sounds.

Korg offers many versatile digital pianos in a very reasonable price range. The C1 Air model is a good option with technological advancements like Bluetooth. Artists who use Korg digital pianos include Richard Clayderman, Herbie Hancock, and Tom Coster.

Roland


Roland, also from Japan, offers both digital and acoustic pianos in a moderate price range. They are aesthetically-pleasing pianos that are recommended for a variety of needs.

Whether you’re a beginner looking for a digital piano or a more serious pianist looking for a well-made acoustic, Roland has something for you. The F-120 is a popular model for a beginner looking for a digital piano. Jim Brickman, David Benoit, and Marcus Johnson all play Rolands.

How to Find the Best Piano Brands For You

Whether you’re a beginner or advanced pianist, there are some guidelines you can follow to make the process of choosing a piano easier. Before you decide, spend some time considering the following factors.

    • How much room do you have for a piano?
      • Answering this question will help you choose between a digital and acoustic piano, since digital pianos can take up much less room. It can also help you decide between an acoustic upright piano or an acoustic grand piano.
    • Do you prefer digital or acoustic pianos?
      • While many prefer the feeling of striking an acoustic piano’s keys, these pianos do come with some additional upkeep. And don’t forget to factor in the cost of annual tuning, which is essential for acoustic pianos. 
    • What is your budget for a piano?
      • Setting a budget will help you narrow down your options. Your budget will affect whether you buy new versus used, digital versus acoustic, or one piano brand over another.
    • What are your goals with playing piano?
      • Just because you’re a beginner who doesn’t need 88 keys right now, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future. Likewise, after a few years you might feel unsatisfied with a cheaper keyboard that doesn’t have weighted keys. Think about investing more so you can keep enjoying your piano over the years. Or if you’re just trying out piano, start small and upgrade once you’re more committed to playing.

Lastly, always try a piano in person before you buy it. Choosing a piano is a very personal decision with many factors unique to each individual, such as the feel of the piano. Trying different piano brands in person is the best way to gain insight into the right piano for you.

If you still need help deciding between the many piano brands that are available, try seeking advice from an experienced piano teacher.

Now that you’ve explored all of the best piano brands, start improving your playing skills in the free piano classes at TakeLessons Live. There are daily classes available for every kind of pianist. Here’s to your new piano!

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Guitar vs Piano: Which Instrument Do Musicians Prefer? [Vote]

Guitar vs piano

So you want to learn a musical instrument and you’ve narrowed it down to the guitar vs piano. Which one should you play?

One of the biggest advantages to playing the guitar is its quick learning curve, but an equally excellent reason to learn the piano is its layout that helps you understand music theory.

If you’re debating between learning piano vs guitar, here are five important factors to consider about the pros and cons of each instrument.  

Already made up your mind? Cast your vote below!

 

Which instrument do you prefer: guitar or piano?

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Guitar vs Piano: Which is Better?

The Learning Curve for Piano and Guitar

learning piano vs guitar

Piano – Learn Notes and Scales First

As a beginner pianist, you’ll most likely learn how to play melodies before you learn chords. You’ll learn notes and scales first. Then, you’ll make different combinations of those notes to form chords.

Dealing with scales before chords in this way allows for a more chronological approach to music theory. In contrast to changing keys on the guitar by simply using a capo, on a piano you’ll have to use theory to transpose the key.

Don’t be intimidated by all this, because the piano lends itself toward music theory very well; the linear layout of the instrument is the perfect visual aid. However because you’re learning theory, playing your favorite songs on the piano can take longer than on guitar.

Guitar – Learn Chords Quickly

Students who want to start playing songs right away typically lean toward the guitar vs piano. The guitar is an integral part of most pop songs, so it’s easy to find songs you can play once you learn the right set of chords.  

Also, if you find that the key needs to be changed to fit your vocal range, you can simply attach a capo to the guitar and use the same chord shapes. While using a capo isn’t necessary to change keys on the guitar, it’s a simplified option that many guitarists use.

Affordability of the Guitar vs Piano

price of guitar vs piano

Guitar – $100 to $1,000

A good starter guitar typically costs between $100-$200. Guitars have become more affordable over the years with competition between local and online music stores. But before buying a guitar, it’s highly recommended that you play it first.

If you happen to be able to afford a guitar between $300-$500, you’ll see a significant improvement in playability and sound. There are many quality guitars available in this range. A guitar in the $500-$1,000 range would be best fit for a more advanced guitarist.

Piano – $100 to $1500+

A good beginner keyboard can be found between $100-$200. Factors to consider in this price range are the number of keys and whether they are weighted or non-weighted keys. As a beginner pianist, you can learn just fine on a 61-key keyboard.

As you develop though, the songs you’ll play will require a greater range on the piano. That’s when a full size, 88-key keyboard or digital piano would be needed. Digital pianos are generally around $500-$1,500 and are designed to more closely replicate acoustic pianos in sound and feel.

Lastly, if you can afford it and have room for one, acoustic pianos are the way to go. These start at roughly $1,500 but the unrivaled tone and feel make it worth the investment if you are really serious about learning piano.  

Reading Music for Guitar vs Piano

learning piano vs guitar

Guitar – Chord Charts and TABs

Chord charts are the main form of notation for reading chords on the guitar. They are quick and easy to learn how to read. Chord charts indicate when to play a chord by showing chord names above the lyrics.

The other notation most widely used on guitar is tablature notation, also known as TABs. TABs is a notation that is specific to guitar because it resembles the instrument closely. The six lines represent the guitar’s six strings, and the numbers indicate which fret to press down.

Learning how to read TABs is simple and allows you to mine the databases of endless pop and rock songs online. However, one downside to chord charts and TABs is that they are not as precise as standard notation.

Piano – Reading Standard Notation

Chord charts are also used for reading music on the piano. But in addition, the piano staff is added underneath the chord names. In this way, notation for the piano is generally more complex.

Standard notation is fairly easy to learn on piano because the two closely resemble each other. Just like the notes on the piano ascend from left to right, the notes on the staff ascend from low to high. So if a goal of yours is to learn sheet music, you’ll achieve that early on in piano lessons.

Portability of the Guitar vs Piano

guitar vs piano

Guitar – Travel Friendly

The guitar is one of the most portable instruments. Even the bulkiest guitars can be taken on road trips and public transportation. Airplanes widely consider guitars a carry-on item that can be stored in overhead compartments.

In addition there are a wide variety of travel, mini, and backpacker guitars that are very small and lightweight. As long as you have a good guitar case, you should be able to take your guitar with you anywhere!

Piano – Portable Options are Limited

There is a wide variety of piano sizes to choose from to suit your needs. If you’re looking for the smallest and lightest possible option, you can turn to midi controllers that range from a couple octaves to all 88 keys. However, these must be plugged into a computer which produces the sound.

The next size up are keyboards that also range from a couple octaves to 88 keys. They are generally a little bigger and heavier than midi controllers, but are easier to transport than most digital pianos (which is the next size up).

The largest options are acoustic pianos, which include a variety of upright and grand pianos. Their weighted keys give you more expressiveness and greater potential for dynamics, but keep in mind that you will have to sacrifice the convenience of a portable instrument.

Best Musical Genres for Piano and Guitar

Learning piano vs guitar

Piano – Classical

Classical musicians often start learning piano vs guitar. Because of the instrument’s rich history in classical music, students can expect to encounter classical compositions early on in the learning process.

Just like the guitar though, the piano is a very versatile instrument that can be heard in many other genres of music. Pop music in general seems to more commonly include keyboards than guitars.

Guitar – Rock

Most rock enthusiasts prefer the guitar over the piano. Guitar is the quintessential rock instrument. Early rock and roll pioneers who played the guitar include Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry. They paved the way for later “rock guitar gods,” from Jimi Hendrix to Jimmy Page.

When people think of rock music, they think of distorted electric guitars. This is such a specific sound that the guitar holds the market in, but it’s also an extremely versatile instrument. That clean, acoustic guitar sound is popular in other genres as well, such as country music.

Take a Lesson!

By now you can see the pros and cons of learning piano vs guitar. To help you reach a decision about which is better for you, consider these five factors: learning curve, affordability, music notation, portability, and your desired musical genres.

Ultimately, the best thing you can do to decide is try out both instruments. On TakeLessons Live, you can try beginner-level classes for free in both piano and guitar. Try it today!

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Am I Too Old To Learn Piano? 5 Answers from Expert Piano Teachers

Am I too old to learn piano

People of many different ages find themselves asking the question: am I too old to learn piano? No matter your age, playing the piano is a wonderful skill to have for a variety of reasons.

Studies have shown that playing music reduces stress and improves the memory. Playing an instrument in a group also leads to lifelong friendships, while refining communication and social skills.

If you’re wondering whether or not your age will stand in between you and all the benefits of playing the piano, keep reading. We asked five piano experts for their thoughts on adult students, from different age groups, learning to play the instrument.

“Am I Too Old to Learn Piano?” Get Answers Here. 

Is 20-30 Too Old to Learn Piano?

Liz T. – Piano Teacher in Brooklyn, NY

“Learning to play, or picking back up, the piano or keyboard in your 20s is a wonderful idea! Many students from a variety of fields enjoy exploring their creative side in addition to their professions. Diving into the piano is also a nice release from your busy work day.

If a student had attempted to play piano when they were much younger, but didn’t have the focus or patience, oftentimes this focus is much more narrowed as an adult, and the concepts are easier to comprehend when you’re between 20-30.”

What is Your Advice to Students in This Age Group?

“My advice for adults learning to play piano is to take a fun song you know, and start from the basics. Learn the melody with the left hand, then the right hand, and put them together. Practice a little bit each day, even if it’s for 15 minutes in the morning when you wake up, and 15 minutes before you go to bed at night.”

Is 30-40 Too Old to Learn Piano?

Rebecca K. – Piano Teacher in Vallejo, CA

“The 30-40 age is such a unique and frankly, exhausting time to live. I know- I’m there myself! Many of us have young kids, a job, and enough worries to fill a bank account (even when it feels like nothing else can). That’s why I argue that this age is the PERFECT time to start learning piano! Self-care is something we must practice, especially in finding something that brings you joy.”

What is Your Advice to Students in This Age Group?

“All piano takes is dedication, an instrument, and a little bit of time. You’re never too old to start learning piano; you may, however, get to a point where you regret not starting sooner!”

Is 40-50 Too Old to Learn Piano?

James F. – Piano Teacher in Charlotte, NC

“There is no age that is really ‘too old’ to learn to play the piano. However, there are lifestyle factors that typically get in the way of progress once somebody enters the workforce full-time.

Many of my adult students have struggled with balancing a professional career, a family, and their progress as a piano player. There are ways, however, for the disciplined student to overcome this.”

What is Your Advice to Students in This Age Group?

“I recommend practicing in 10-25 minute sets, two to four times a day. Three times a day or more is really ideal, as in – wake up a little bit earlier to practice, do another session as soon as you get home, and another one right before bed. With this routine, you will see progress.”

Is 50-60 Too Old to Learn Piano?

William P. – Piano Teacher in Waterbury, Connecticut

“Learning piano has no age limit. In fact, activities like learning piano can stimulate the brain, increasing the ability to recall information. There are physical benefits to learning piano as well.

By practicing fine motor skills in your fingers, piano students are keeping the muscles in their hands flexible. Having flexibility in your hands can combat arthritis and improve circulation in your fingers.”

What is Your Advice to Students in This Age Group?

“There are three things to keep in mind. The first is that music is like a language, and it requires time and patience to achieve steady growth. Secondly, physical problems such as arthritis or joint stiffness are only minor obstacles that can easily be overcome.

Lastly, learning an instrument should be seen as a simple pleasure in life and not a chore. Approach it as a time to explore your musical side!”

Is 70+ Too Old to Learn Piano?

Marie France M. – Piano Teacher in Waldwick, NJ

“There are certain advantages the 70+ student brings to the table. They are self-motivated which means no one has to push them to practice and they know what they want to learn, which gives the teacher a clear focus.”

What is Your Advice to Students in This Age Group?

“Elder students do have a higher percentage of physical challenges than their younger counterparts, particularly with eyesight and arthritis. I recommend having good direct lighting, and a magnifying glass in reach. Large print music is also a real plus.

Work in five-minute increments with a moment in between to massage the fingers and do a quick posture and relaxation check before going on.”

Next Steps for Learning Piano as an Adult…

When it comes to learning the piano, age is just a number! Now that you no longer have to wonder “Am I too old to learn piano?”, here are a few steps you can take to get started.

  • Find a piano teacher who has experience working with older students.
  • Not ready for private lessons yet? Try free online piano classes.
  • Commit to practicing everyday and take baby steps.
  • Remember to enjoy yourself! Piano lessons and practice should be fun.
  • Stay motivated by keeping the reasons you want to learn piano top of mind.

Whether playing the piano is an escape from the stresses of life, a goal you’ve wanted to pursue for years, or an exercise to help with the effects of aging, you won’t regret starting your piano-learning journey today.

Are you an older piano student with advice to share? Leave a comment below and share your tips!

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easy classical piano songs

15 Easy Classical Piano Songs for Beginners [Videos]

easy classical piano songs for beginners

Looking for some easy classical piano songs to add to your repertoire? You’ve come to the right place!

While mastering the works of Mozart, Bach, and Beethoven might sound intimidating, there are a number of easy classical piano songs that you can learn.

If you’re interested in learning the classical piano style, start by practicing this list of easy piano songs. Learning these beginner piano songs will give you a solid foundation that you can build upon as you advance in your lessons.

15 Easy Classical Piano Songs for Beginners

1. Bach’s “Prelude to the Well Tempered Clavichord”

This easy classical song uses two simple piano notes in the left hand, with arpeggios in the right hand. It’s not too long of a song, and it’s great to play around with dynamics too.

2. Mozart’s “A Little Night Music” 1st Movement


This orchestral piece can be easily transferred to solo piano. Check out this helpful tutorial, which breaks it down at a much slower pace and don’t forget to use a metronome while you practice!

3. Chopin’s “Prelude in E min, Opus 28, No 4”


This melancholy minor classical piece has a simple melody in the right hand, with basic chords on the left hand.

4. Edward MacDowell’s “To a Wild Rose”


This easy classical piano song is a very light, simplistic classical piece. It sounds easy and refreshing, with simple fingering.

See Also: 15 Simple Piano Solos that Sound Complicated

5. Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy”

This is often the first classical piano song that students try when learning how to play the piano. That’s because the song has a very simple rhythm, melody, and fingering.

6. Debussy’s “Claire du Lune”


Meaning “moonlight,” this classical piano song for beginners is pretty straightforward. You can find many simple arrangements to this piece on YouTube.

7. Strauss’ “The Blue Danube”


This fun waltz might sound tricky, but it is actually not hard to play at all. Check out the slowed-down version above.

See Also: 15 Pop Piano Songs to Practice

8. Offenbach’s “Can-Can”


If you want a small challenge, this uptempo song is perfect. Try listening to the original orchestral version for some extra inspiration.

9. Schubert’s “Ave Maria”


“Ave Maria” is a must for beginners learning how to play classical music. This beautiful beginner piano song is appropriate to play at many events, such as weddings and funerals.

10. Pachelbell’s “Cannon in D”


Originally performed with strings, this classical piano song can sound very full when played on the piano with chords.

See Also: 10 Tips for Perfect Piano Practice

11. Beethoven’s “Fur Elise”


One of the most memorable melodies on the piano, beginners can easily pick up this piece in the right hand, and use simplified bass root notes in the left.

12. Bach’s “Minuet in G”


Another easy piece that sounds difficult, this minuet is a joy to play for all ages. Because it’s quite popular, it’s easy to find different arrangements of it online.

13. Tchaikovsky’s Theme from “Swan Lake”


Everyone knows this romantic anthem, often played to accompany dancers. The legato piece has a strong melody and a very easy rhythm.

See Also: 100 Easy Piano Songs to Play in All Genres and Styles

14. Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugar Plumb Fairy”


This iconic song from “The Nutcracker” is very fun to learn on the piano. You can take it as fast or as slow as you want. It’s also a great song for practicing stacattos.

15. Lizt and Rossini’s “William Tell Overture”


This is another one of those easy classical piano songs that’s sure to please. There are many great themes from this work to which you can learn the melody and rhythm.

Related: 5 Easy Pop Songs to Play

Now go ahead and give it a try! Don’t feel intimated or overwhelmed by classical music – just start with these easy classical piano songs for beginners.

If you’re feeling stuck, you can find simplified arrangements to all of these songs in piano books, such as Hal Leonard and Alfred’s course books. Or you can ask a local piano teacher for help.

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LizTPost Author: Liz T.
Liz T. teaches singing, acting, and music lessons online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

Photo by Carlos Gracia

100 Piano Pop Songs Everyone Will Love

Best piano pop songs to learn and play

Looking for a list of the best piano songs ever? Check out this list of the top piano pop songs of all time!

Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, there are tons of easy pop songs on piano. Learning piano pop songs will keep you interested in the instrument and help improve your performance skills.

Here is a list of 100 great piano songs that everyone will enjoy. Choose a few favorites to add to your repertoire, but keep in mind that some of these piano pop songs are more difficult than others. If you can’t play one, just move onto an easier one!

The Best Piano Songs of All Time: Pop Edition

Best Piano Pop Songs for Kids

fun pop songs for kids to play on keyboard or piano

  • Don’t Worry, Be Happy: Bobby McFerrin
  • Go the Distance: Hercules
  • Mmm Bop: Hanson
  • Let it Go: Frozen
  • Happy: Pharrell Williams
  • You’ll be in My Heart: Tarzan
  • Accidentally in Love: Shrek
  • Ain’t No Mountain High Enough: Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell
  • A Whole New World: Aladdin
  • Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen
  • I See the Light: Tangled
  • Somewhere Over the Rainbow: Judy Garland
  • The Rainbow Connection: Kermit the Frog
  • My Girl: Temptations
  • Circle of Life: The Lion King
  • I Got You Babe: Sonny and Cher
  • Kiss The Girl: The Little Mermaid
  • Do You Want to Build A Snowman?: Frozen
  • Wouldn’t It Be Nice: The Beach Boys
  • Reflection: Mulan
  • That’s How You Know: Enchanted
  • YMCA: Village People
  • Part of Your World: The Little Mermaid
  • The Medallion Calls: Pirates of the Caribbean

RELATED: 15 Easy Classical Piano Songs for Beginners

Best Piano Songs for Teens

cool and popular modern songs for teens to play on piano

  • Get Lucky: Daft Punk
  • Sexy and I Know It: LMFAO
  • Thrift Shop: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis
  • Clarity: Zedd
  • Born This Way: Lady Gaga
  • Thinking Out Loud: Ed Sheeran
  • Before He Cheats: Carrie Underwood
  • Boyfriend: Justin Beiber
  • Single Ladies: Beyonce
  • Party in the U.S.A: Miley Cyrus
  • California Girls: Katie Perry
  • Trouble: Taylor Swift
  • I Want It That Way: Backstreet Boys
  • Bye, Bye, Bye: NSYNC
  • Waterfalls: TLC
  • Wannabe: Spice Girls
  • Hit Me Baby One More Time: Britney Spears
  • Ain’t No Other Man: Christina Aguilera
  • Lady Marmalade: Moulin Rouge
  • I Believe I Can Fly: R. Kelly
  • Rehab: Amy Winehouse
  • Uptown Funk: Bruno Mars
  • Rolling in the Deep: Adele
  • Hey Ya: Outkast
  • Torn: Natalie Imbruglia
  • Wonderwall: Oasis
  • Hero: Mariah Carey
  • Respect: Aretha Franklin
  • Shake It Off: Taylor Swift

Best Pop Songs on Piano for Adults

best pop piano songs for adults

  • The Piano Man: Billy Joel
  • Bennie and the Jets: Elton John
  • Dancing Queen: Abba
  • Hey Jude: The Beatles
  • California Dreaming: The Mamma’s and The Papa’s
  • Roxanne: Sting
  • Superstitious: Stevie Wonder
  • River Deep, Mountain High: Tina Turner
  • Natural Woman: Carole King
  • Can’t Help Falling in Love: Elvis
  • American Pie: Don McLean
  • I Can’t Make You Love Me: Bonnie Raitt
  • What a Wonderful World: Ray Charles
  • Do You Think I’m Sexy: Rod Stewart
  • Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For: U2
  • Hotel California: The Eagles
  • Crazy: Willie Nelson and Patsy Cline
  • I Will Always Love You: Dolly Parton
  • Moondance: Van Morrison
  • Knockin on Heaven’s Door: Bob Dylan
  • Bridge Over Troubled Water: Simon and Garfunkel
  • Last Dance: Donna Summers
  • Stairway to Heaven: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • Big Yellow Taxi: Joni Mitchell
  • Born in the U.S.A: Bruce Springsteen
  • My Heart will Go On: Celine Dion
  • Material Girl: Madonna
  • Time After Time: Cyndi Lauper
  • Stop! In the Name of Love: Diana Ross
  • Lanslide: Fleetwood Mac
  • Wind Beneath My Wings: Bette Midler
  • Don’t rain on my Parade: Barbara Streisand
  • Don’t Stop Believing: Journey
  • Sweet Caroline: Neil Diamond
  • Smooth Criminal: Michael Jackson
  • I’ve Had the Time of My Life: Dirty Dancing
  • I’ll Make Love to You: Boyz II men
  • Un-Break My Heart: Toni Braxton
  • Killing Me Softly: Roberta Flack
  • Ironic: Alanis Morrisette
  • Kiss From a Rose: Seal
  • Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Pat Benatar
  • I Can’t Get No Satisfaction: The Rolling Stones
  • At Last: Etta James
  • Sweet Child of Mine: Guns and Roses
  • Sweet Home Alabama: Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • Livin on a Prayer: Bon Jovi

SEE ALSO: Introduction to Reading Piano Notes

Where to Find Sheet Music for Piano Pop Songs

Now that you’ve browsed through the top 100 pop songs on piano, chances are you’re going to need some piano sheet music. Here are a few helpful websites where you can find sheet music for all of the piano pop songs above.

  • PianoPlayIt: From pop to Disney, this website has great piano songs for kids and beginners. The best part – it’s free! Check out the website here.
  • 8notes.com: This website is another great resource for piano sheet music. You can browse through categories such as “play along jam tracks,” “most popular piano,” and more! Check out the website here.
  • OnlinePianist: This website also has a wide variety of piano pop songs. OnlinePianist is extra helpful because it indicates whether a song is beginner, intermediate, or advanced. Check out the website here.

Now you’re ready to expand your repertoire with the best piano songs of all time. If you need help learning any new techniques or styles that these songs require, try asking an expert piano teacher for some guidance. Private lessons with a piano professional are a great way to improve your skills in a short amount of time!

Photos by woodleywonderworks and Jeff Dun

LizTPost Author: Liz T.
Liz T. teaches piano lessons online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a BM in Vocal Performance and currently teaches all styles of music including Classical, Jazz, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

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Classical Pianists

Which of These Classical Pianists are You Most Like? [Quiz]

Classical Pianists

Have you ever wondered which famous classical pianist you resemble the most? Take this fun quiz to find out whether your personality and musical traits have more in common with Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, or Chopin!

Which of These Classical Pianists are You Most Like?

To this day, famous classical pianists such as Beethoven, Bach, Mozart, and Chopin are regarded as some of the pioneers of classical music. Students around the world are still studying and performing the works of these four remarkable composers.

But how much do you actually know about their lives and stories? Here are some fun and interesting facts to spark your curiosity!

Fun Facts About 4 Famous Classical Pianists

Ludwig van Beethoven

At seven years old, Beethoven gave his first public performance in Germany as a virtuoso pianist. By the age of 12, he published nine variations in C minor for the piano. He quickly became admired by many aristocrats in Vienna. Although he had tremendous talent, he also reportedly had a terrible temper, too.

Beethoven spent his entire life composing beautiful works, even despite losing his hearing. He was able to make a living performing and commissioning public works.

He also took on many music students, (whom he often became romantically involved with). Many classical music fans consider the “Missa Solemnis” to be Beethoven’s greatest work.

Frédéric Chopin

Chopin is known as the greatest composer of Poland and the greatest pianist of the Romantic era. After growing up as a child prodigy, he quickly rose to fame in Europe. He performed and composed for the piano alone, and accompaniments.

Chopin was very innovative in his piano technique, fingering, and melodies. He became a popular teacher, and as he grew older he actually began to dislike public performances.

Chopin’s etudes and mazurkas have stood the test of time. After losing a battle to tuberculosis, his heart was placed in an urn in the Holy Cross Church of Krakowskie Przedmiscie.

SEE ALSO: What’s Your Piano Style? [Quiz]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Mozart is regarded as the most influential composer of the Classical era. He had a reputation for not being “well behaved” in public. He also reportedly had a daring style and sense of humor.

Mozart came from a family of musicians in Austria and his parents pushed him to greatness. His music became known for its harmonic innovation which he demonstrated in piano, violin, and orchestral compositions.

His operas “The Magic Flute,” “Don Giovanni,” and “The Marriage of Figaro” are still popular performances today. Mozart influenced many composers to follow including Haydn and Handel.

Johann Sebastian Bach

Bach spent most of his life performing and composing in Germany. He was highly skilled at playing the organ at a young age.

Bach came from a family of musicians and played for many people of noble stature, including royalty. He had an excellent reputation as a performer. He also experimented with religious compositions of the Catholic mass, including the Kyrie and Gloria.

His compositions, such as “Ave Maria” and “Toccata and Fugue in D Minor,” gained notable popularity over the years. However, few of Bach’s works were published during his lifetime. He suffered major health issues at the end of his life including blindness. Many consider Bach to be the best composer of the Baroque era.

Each of these musicians were innovative thinkers who embraced their own unique musical styles. Without their boldness, the world would be at a loss for such captivating classical piano compositions.

Are you ready to learn some of the great works by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and Chopin? Schedule a piano lesson today to get started.

Leave us a comment below and share which classical pianist you’re most like!

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LizTPost Author: Liz T.
Liz T. teaches piano, singing, acting, and many more subjects online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M. in Vocal Performance and performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

5 Easy Piano Songs for Kids + Video Tutorials

Easy Piano Songs for Kids with LettersWhether you have a grand piano or a small, electronic keyboard, you can teach your child many easy piano songs for kids. It doesn’t matter how much your child knows about music either; they’re sure to enjoy learning with the fun songs on this list.

Before you get started, you’ll need to learn the location of the notes on the piano. Start by finding C – it’s the white key directly to the left of the group of two black keys.

Using only the white keys, the notes continue in alphabetical order up to G, and then they restart at A. So you can label them (C, D, E, F, G, A, B) if you’d like with stickers or different colors to make it easier for your child.

5 Easy Piano Songs for Kids

Mary Had a Little Lamb

This is often one of the first piano songs for kids that instructors will teach new students. The song has additional verses about the adventures Mary and her lamb have, to keep the fun going while you sing and play together. Check out the verses and the notes below them.

Mary had a little lamb
E D C D E E E
Little lamb, little lamb
D D D E G G
Mary had a little lamb
E D C D E E E
Its fleece was white as snow
E D D E D C

Here’s an excellent video tutorial, showing all the notes labeled:

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

Any beginner will love playing this children’s classic on the piano. One of the great things about this song is that almost every note is played twice in a row, meaning there are fewer notes for your child to locate.

Twinkle, twinkle, little star
C C G G A A G
How I wonder what you are
F F E E D D C
Up above the world so high
G G F F E E D
Like a diamond in the sky
G G F F E E D
Twinkle, twinkle, little star
C C G G A A G
How I wonder what you are
F F E E D D C

Here’s a helpful video tutorial from Mahalo.com for more practice:

If You’re Happy and You Know It

This is one of the most fun piano songs for kids. The song gives your little musician the chance to clap and dance while playing. The only tricky part of this song is the inclusion of B flat.

This note is the small black key located directly between the A and B keys. If you are using a toy piano or xylophone, you may not have this key and can leave it out.

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands
C C F F F F F F E F G
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands
C C G G G G G G F G A
If you’re happy and you know it
A A Bb Bb Bb Bb D D
Then your face will surely show it
Bb Bb A A A G F F
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands
A A G G G F E E D E F

Here’s another helpful tutorial:

The Itsy Bitsy Spider

Children love singing this song and it’s pretty simple to play, too. One fun idea is for you to play the song while your child does the motions, then switch roles.

The itsy bitsy spider went up the water spout
G C C C D E E E D C D E C
Down came the rain and washed the spider out
E E F G G F E F G E
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
C C D E E D C D E C
And the itsy bitsy spider went up the spout again
G G C C C D E E E D C D E C

Here’s a super slow tutorial that is easy to follow along with:

Old MacDonald Had a Farm

This is another classic children’s song that your son or daughter will love playing over and over again so they can sing about every animal on the farm.

Old MacDonald had a farm
G G G D E E D
E-i-e-i-o
B B A A G
And on that farm he had a cow
D G G G D E E D
E-i-e-i-o
B B A A G
With a moo moo here and a moo moo there
D D G G G D D G G G
Here a moo, there a moo
G G G G G G
Everywhere a moo moo
G G G G G G
Old MacDonald had a farm
G G G D E E D
E-i-e-i-o
B B A A G

Here’s a tutorial for this easy piano song:

Any of these easy piano songs for kids will help your child learn how to play the piano and have fun while doing it.

If your child enjoys playing these songs, consider signing him or her up for private piano lessons. This is a great way to improve their technique!

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Photo by Eduardo Merille

How to Use Apps to Supplement Your Piano Lessons

How to Use Apps to Supplement Your Piano Lessons | 7 Ideas

How to Use Apps to Supplement Your Piano Lessons

Want to really improve your piano skills? Making the most of your practice time is key! Learn how to use piano apps as you practice in this guest post by Aravind Abraham from OnlinePianist

 

Piano students, you probably know by now that regular practice is essential to your progress and overall success. And luckily, practicing doesn’t have to be boring! Music apps provide a fun way to spice up your practice routine, and are a great way to supplement your piano lessons

Let’s take a look at seven ways you can use piano apps to improve your skills, sharpen your technique, and make the most of your time in between lessons.

  1. Use Apps to Practice Scales

Scales are fundamental to every pianist regardless of level. From beginner to virtuoso, pianists need to constantly tickle the ivories to stay sharp. A great app to use for this is Musiclock. If you’re interested in making scale practice fun, try this one. It has the grooviest set of backing tracks that you can use for scales and general improvising.

  1. Use Apps to Practice Reading Sheet Music

Reading sheet music is an important part of being a good pianist. The age-old language has been passed from generation to generation and withstood the test of time. While not specifically an app, the best new software for sight reading has to be Sight Reading Academy, a website that you can access from any device. You’ll get daily sight reading exercises and training to help you improve your skills. 

MTA SightReadPlus is another good option — this piano app shows you a note to play on the staff and then listens as you play it on your piano. It can be tuned to your instrument, so it works even if your piano is older and down-tuned.

  1. Use Apps to Master Chords and Notes

The ability to quickly recognize chords and notes is an important skill for any musician, but especially pianists. Piano Notes Pro is an awesome app to master this skill. You can choose the clef, range, accidentals, number of notes to quiz, etc. and then you play the notes on the piano on the screen. It’s extremely customizable and easy to use. It can also be used with MIDI input so that you can play the notes that come up on the screen. 

  1. Use Apps for Aural Training On-The-Go

How often do you work on ear training? Tenuto is a good aural training app for recognizing chords, intervals, and so on. It also shows you how everything looks on the keyboard.

Another good option for ear training practice is Right Note, a great app to learn about intervals, pitch, and melody.

  1. Use Apps to Practice Performing 

Ready for your debut on stage? You can practice playing concertos with Play Mozart, which features high-quality orchestral recordings with an on-screen score. You set the tempo and the music (and orchestra) scrolls and plays. It’s a great option if you want to get a feel for working with a real orchestra, and the sound quality is excellent.

Also in this category is Home Concert Xtreme, which lets you load in any MIDI score. 

  1. Use Apps to Review Musical Notation

While there are a few options for hand-written notation on the iPad, one of the best is Touch Notation by Kawai. If you want to play your piece into the iPad with MIDI, then check out Notion.

  1. Use Apps to Play Your Favorite Songs

If you want to practice playing songs with a piano app, try OnlinePianist. This online piano app contains an interactive library of songs, chords, and animated notes. It has over a dozen features, including a metronome, tempo adjustment, a sustain indicator, and built-in lessons. 

 

Outside of the recommendations above, there are plenty of other helpful apps for musicians. Ultimately, the goal is the same whether you use one app or another — to maximize your piano potential. Have fun exploring, practicing, and playing! 

Aravind Abraham lives in Tel Aviv, Israel and has been involved with the piano since he was a kid. Having first taken piano lessons in school, he then spent a few years performing as a keyboardist for bands in Auckland, New Zealand. He now manages OnlinePianist’s marketing, emphasizing their vision of helping today’s technologically savvy society learn the piano online.

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Diana Krall jazz piano

9 Easy Jazz Piano Songs to Learn Today [Video Tutorials]

Diana Krall jazz piano

Interested in learning jazz? Try your hand at some of these easy jazz songs, recommended by piano teacher Heather L...

 

Like many other music styles, jazz has seen its phases. It’s gone from being the most popular genre in America, to the least popular, and now to something that almost everyone appreciates. And yet most piano students feel so intimidated by jazz that they don’t even try learning it.

I’m here to tell you: give it a shot! Below, I’ve compiled a list of nine easy jazz piano songs you can try, along with tips for playing jazz piano. Let’s start with the tips:

How to Play Jazz Piano

Jazz is a blast to play on the piano! If you’re used to playing classical piano styles, I recommend starting with these tips for transitioning to the jazz style. Next, you’ll want to review these jazz piano chords, and try out some of these helpful exercises. Beyond these articles, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Play eighth notes unevenly, so that four of them sound like this: “long – short – long – short”. This is called a swing pattern.
  • Play any accents lightly, not heavily as in a lot of other piano music.
  • Play in a slightly detached and clear tone, as if you were playing a Bach piece. Think of little bells!

Easy Jazz Songs to Try

Now that you know some of the basics, here are a few tunes to listen to and try your hand at. Of course, if you’re serious about playing jazz, you’ll want to work with a piano teacher who can show you the ropes — but these easy songs will certainly get you started!

1. “Summertime”

It sounds funny, but this celebrated jazz classic is actually the gem of the acclaimed opera “Porgy and Bess”. Take it slow; it is a lullaby, after all. Simply play the chords in the left hand in a very steady rhythm, and play the melody in a very off-beat way. The word for this is syncopation, which means unexpected rhythmic patterns. Don’t think too much about it; just be creative. Watch the video a few times, then start playing along!

Sheet Music Download — via Sheet Music Plus

2. “When the Saints Go Marching In”

If you can play “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”, then you can play “When the Saints Go Marching In”. And because this song’s melody is so simple, it’s the perfect song to help you learn how to improvise! It’s often included in beginner piano books, and the following tutorial will teach you the melody.

This song is really easy and the video takes it very slowly. Once you learn the melody, you can find lots of versions of this song online — and you can play it in an even jazzier way by changing the rhythm of when and how you play the left-hand chords. For instance, you can play the same block chords in eighth notes instead of quarter notes (in other words, twice as fast).

Sheet Music Download — via Sheet Music Plus

3. “Fly Me to the Moon”

Classic crooner Frank Sinatra made this song famous, and now you can make it your own! First, though, watch the tutorial below. The keys highlighted in blue are played by the right hand; the keys highlighted in yellow are played by the left hand.

Play along with the video a few times with only your right hand, and then again with only your left hand, before playing with hands together.

Sheet Music Download — MusicNotes

4. “Autumn Leaves”

“Autumn Leaves” is one of the best easy jazz songs for beginners, because it introduces us to jazz harmony and the popular chord progression ii – V – I – IV. Unfamiliar with these symbols? It means that if you’re playing in the key of C, this chord progression would be D minor, then G, then C, and finally F. The tutorial below goes a little fast, so watch it a few times before you even begin to play along.

Sheet Music Download — MusicNotes

5. “Misty”

This tutorial is easy to follow, taking the right hand first, one note at a time. The second time through, the player shows us the left-hand three-note chords, or triads. Feel free to play the left hand alone, ignoring the right hand the first few times through, since the left-hand chords will become the steady “time-keeper” of your playing. Then, add the right-hand melody later after the left hand becomes almost automatic.

Sheet Music Download — Sheet Music Plus

6. “Someone to Watch Over Me”

George and Ira Gershwin wrote a musical in 1943 called “Oh, Kay!” and this song is perhaps its most famous. Lots of singers have covered it, and lots of pianists love to play it!

This arrangement is a little different, in that it has the left hand playing the melody, and the right hand playing chords. If it seems a little too difficult, it’s okay to simplify the rhythm. As always, take your time and practice hands separately at first.

Sheet Music Download — MusicNotes

7. “Take the A Train”

Kent Hewitt leads this fun video about Duke Ellington’s classic, “Take the A Train”. He may sound like he’s playing something really complicated in the left hand, but remember, he’s only playing the chords of the song in different ways. For example, instead of playing a D chord in a root position block, he’ll play the D way down low, and then the F# and A up in the middle of the keyboard. In this video he guides you all the way through his own version. Have fun!

Sheet Music Download — MusicNotes

8. “Satin Doll”

“Satin Doll” may be one of the most famous jazz songs of all time. This tutorial will teach you the famous introduction and explain the importance of triplets in swing music, and more importantly, how to play them!

Sheet Music Download — Sheet Music Plus

9. “So What”

Again, this version has the melody in the left hand and the chords in the right. For most of us, the left hand is just not as dextrous as the right. In other words, it’s not as easy to stretch and move. If you have a favorite exercise set, (like Hanon) practicing it daily will help you get ready to play this song.

Be warned: the piano player in the video below talks about some advanced stuff, like modes and modulations. But don’t feel intimidated! You can still play the song — stay patient, and take your time.

Sheet Music Download — Sheet Music Plus


This list of easy jazz songs is only the beginning. Jazz music is a gold mine of timeless standards and classic pieces to add to your repertoire!

Just remember, online tutorials are wonderful tools, but they’ll only take you so far. Progressing takes two first steps: listening to a lot of jazz piano music, and finding a great teacher! Chances are, there’s a quality instructor in your area or online who’s perfect for you. Don’t have one yet? Check out my profile, or find a piano teacher in your area!

Photo by Bruno Bollaert

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left hand piano exercises

Videos: 4 Super-Effective Left-Hand Piano Exercises

left hand piano exercises

Struggling with your left-hand piano technique? Don’t worry — it’s a common challenge for beginners. Follow along with the videos in this post as teacher Liz T. shares a few helpful exercises… 

 

One of the hardest parts about playing the piano is coordinating your two hands. Often your left hand and your right hand will be playing different notes and rhythms, and it can be really frustrating for beginners!

You might also find you have one hand that is stronger than the other, which makes it even harder when you need to play difficult or fast patterns with your non-dominant hand.

Luckily, with time (and practice, of course), it gets easier. The trick is to isolate each hand, and spend extra time and practice with whichever hand is your weakest. For many, that’s the left-hand piano technique.

Since the left hand usually highlights the bass line and drives the song forward, it’s important not to neglect it! If you are having trouble, I’ll show you a few exercises that will help. Follow along with the videos and let’s strengthen that left hand!

4 Left-Handed Piano Exercises

 

1) Simple Blues Pattern

This pattern is often heard in blues progressions, and it’s great for practicing arpeggios and scales with your left hand. For this exercise, start in the key of C and play 1-3-5-6-b7 (C, E, G, A, Bflat). Once you’ve got that down, try out different keys and work your way to a blues progression. For instance, try the chords of I-IV-V-IV-I (C-F-G-F-C). Once you’ve mastered this exercise, you will feel much more confident improvising!

2) Simple Blues Chords

Use the same I-IV-V-IV-I structure from the first exercise, but this time you will be playing triads. Let’s look at the key of C: first start out in root position, then 1-4-6, then last 1-5-flat 7. This is a common chord progression found in blues, jazz, musical theater, and country music. This is great for practicing navigating your way around chords and strengthening your little fingers!

3) Easy Classical Pattern

This bright, uplifting pattern is a great warm-up for the left hand, and it’s also fantastic for strengthening your pinky finger. You will often come across this style and accompaniment in the left hand in classical music. Let’s start with the key of C: start your pinky on C, then play the chord EG (1, 5), then move to the low G with the pinky. You can use the same fingering as you move through other keys, too.

4) Easy Blues Pattern

Now use a 1-3-5-6-5 pattern with the left hand with a bit of a swing feel! This is a common pattern you’ll hear in blues and jazz, and even some early rock (omitting the flat 7). As with the other left-hand exercises, try this in all keys that you’re comfortable with.

I recommend incorporating these four exercises into your daily practice. If you take time each day, and little by little, you will start to see major improvements in your left-hand piano playing!

And of course, if you’d like to learn even more piano exercises and really improve your skills, working with a private piano teacher is key. I’m available for online piano lessons, or you can search for a local teacher with TakeLessons!

LizTPost Author: Liz T.
Liz T. teaches piano, singing, and other music subjects online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

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