Justin

Vocal Tips: How to Set Yourself Apart as a Singer

Justin

Want to really make an impact on your audience? Take a look at these helpful vocal tips from Jacksonville, FL teacher Justin W. to get started..

Becoming a professional singer is a dream come true for many. Some may want to end up on Broadway or at the Metropolitan Opera, some may want to appear on radio or television, and some may just want to make ends meet through music. Whatever the case, there are thousands, if not millions of people fighting to break into the music industry. As a result, the market is flooded with talent, which means you have to set yourself apart somehow.

Many students who come through my studio seek quick vocal tips to help them stand out as a singer at their next audition, whether it be for a musical at a local theater, a fine arts school, or even for television shows such as The Voice or American Idol. Below, I have collected four of my best and most frequent pieces of advice for all aspiring singers.

  1. Take Weekly Voice Lessons – I cannot stress this point enough; no matter what level you are at, you should be taking weekly voice lessons. Each of us sounds different to our own ears than we do to everyone else’s. Because of this, we cannot trust our own ears. Instead, you need a trained professional to listen, advise, and even critique as necessary. This list includes four vocal tips; your voice teacher can give you countless.
  2. Focus on Breathing – As with life itself, breathing is the most essential aspect of singing. Ensure you are not using too much (or too little) breath when singing; if you have a breathy tone, you’re probably using too much. The appoggio technique is one method that may be used to control and moderate breathing.
  3. Relax! – As an Alexander Technique instructor once told me, “tension kills sound.” While you don’t want to slouch or disrupt your alignment in any way, you also should not have any unnecessary muscle action occurring. Otherwise, you may be too tired to continue halfway through your big solo onstage.
  4. Sing With Your Own Voice – Too many students come into my studio attempting to sound like singers they have heard on the radio. While there is nothing wrong with wanting to sound like your favorite singer, you must stay true to your own voice. This includes staying within your voice type (soprano vs. alto), fach (leggiero tenor vs. dramatic tenor), and allowing the natural timbre of your voice to exist uninhibited. You have to embrace your own voice, instead of imitating others; only then will you ever have a chance of truly setting yourself apart as a singer.

Keep these vocal tips in mind the next time you find yourself preparing for an audition, but don’t stop there; while these tips are essential to standing out from the crowd and furthering your career as a singer, you will undoubtedly discover countless bits of wisdom over time that will improve your singing ability and set you apart from everyone else. And to reiterate a previous point, your best resource is your private instructor, so if you haven’t already, sign up for voice lessons today and further your dreams of becoming a professional singer!

JustinWJustin W. teaches singing, guitar, piano, audition prep, and more in Jacksonville, FL. Justin holds an Associate of Arts degree from Brevard Community College (now Eastern Florida State College) in Cocoa, Florida, and is pursuing his Bachelor of Music Education and Bachelor of Music Performance degrees at University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida. Learn more about Justin here!

 

Interested in Private Lessons?

Search thousands of teachers for local and live, online lessons. Sign up for convenient, affordable private lessons today!

Newsletter Sign Up

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>