7 Easy Country Songs to Play on the Guitar

13918623384_819fee1841_hCountry fans, grab your guitars and start strumming! Guitar teacher David G. made this round up of easy country songs to play on the guitar just for you…

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In the modern music era, country music has become widely popular among all ages of listeners more than any time before in music history. One of the main reasons for this trend in the 21st century is most country musicians fuse their music into a genre called country-pop. When country music first came out, lyrics were typically about the simple times in life addressing everyday tasks or the pure beauty in simple situations.

Currently, modern country songs still incorporate these aspects in their lyrics but place more emphasis on relationships between people as well. In this article, we are going to go through a few easy songs to play on guitar by various country artists. I will explain how to play these songs, and give helpful tips to practice transitioning between chords if you are in the early stages of learning guitar.

1. “Cruise” Florida Georgia Line

Capo 3 G – D – Em – C 2. 2. 2. 2

For this song, The Florida Georgia Line plays the same chord progression for the entire song. Before starting this song place a capo on the 3rd fret of your guitar so that you can play “G form chords” while actually being in the key of Bb.

When I write out music for my students I like to simplify a song into a simple chart that tells the student everything they need to know about how to play the song they are learning. If you look at the chart above it tells you two pieces of information. The first aspect of the chart tells you what chords to play along with the order; and the second aspect tells you that you are going to strum each chord two times before changing to the next chord. (I.E. Strum a G chord two times then a D chord two times then an Em chord two times and then a C chord two times. Once you get to the end repeat the line)

To practice this song accurately turn a metronome to 75 beats per minute and practice matching up one strum to each click on the metronome. (I.E. One strum equals one click)

2. “All Over The Road” – Easton Corbin

Capo 3 D – Em – G – A 2. 2. 2. 2

For this song, Easton Corbin plays the same chord progression for his entire song. Place a capo on the 3rd fret of the guitar just like our first song. This chart tells us that we should play two strums on D then two strums on Em then two strums on G then two strums on A. Place your metronome on 100 beats per minute and practice playing one strum per click on the metronome.

3. “Country Girl” – Luke Bryan

No capo E – G – Asus2 – E 4. 4. 4. 4

For this song, Luke Bryan plays the same chord progression for his entire song. This chart tells you that you should play four strums on E then four strums on G then four strums on Asus2 then four strums on E. Place your metronome on 100 beats per minute and practice playing one strum per click on the metronome.

4. “If I Die Young” – The Band Perry

Capo 4 F – C – G – Am 2. 2. 2. 2

For this song, The Band Perry plays this chord progression for their entire song. Place your capo on the 4th fret of the guitar. This chart tells you that you should strum two times on F then two strums on C then two strums on G then two strums on Am. Place your metronome on 65 beats per minute and practice playing one strum per click on the metronome.

5. “Everything Has Changed” – Taylor Swift

Capo 4 D – Em – G – A 4. 4. 4. 4

For this song, Taylor Swift plays the same chord progression for her entire song. Place your capo on the 4th fret of your guitar. This chart tells you that you should strum four times on D then four strums on Em then four strums on G then four strums on A. Place your metronome on 80 beats per minute and practice playing one strum per click on the metronome.

6. “This Is How We Roll” – Florida Georgia Line

Capo 1 C – G – D 2. 2. 4

For this song, The Florida Georgia Line plays the same chord progression for their entire song. Place your capo on the 1st fret of your guitar. This chart tells you to strum two times on C then two strums on G then four strums on D. Place your metronome on 65 beats per minute and practice playing one strum per click on the metronome.

7. “Compass” – Lady Antebellum

Intro F – C – G 2. 2. 4

Verse (1st :15 – Yeah it’s been a bumpy road) (2nd 1:12 – forgot directions on your way) F – C – G (4x) 2. 2. 4

Pre chorus (:34 – you want to give up cuz it’s dark) Dm – C – F (2x) 3. 1. 4

Chorus (:42 – so let your heart sweetheart) F – C – G – Am – F – C – G (2x) 2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 4 F – C – G (2x) 2. 2. 4

I wanted the last song that I shared with you to have a chord progression that isn’t the same for the entire song. If you look at this chart it separates the song into sections. (Intro/Verses/Pre Chorus/Chorus) It is the same process as the other songs, but you just have to pay attention to where the different sections come in, which I made note of in the chord chart with beginning lyrics of the section and approximate time in the song. Place your metronome on 70 beats per minute and practice playing one strum per click.

Conclusion

Country music, especially modern country music is full of easy songs to play on guitar.

If you analyze all of these songs they generally use a very small amount of chords for an entire song.

The best way to practice changing chords is to practice left hand alone, transitioning chords as slowly as humanly possible for at least a week before playing them full speed. The reason for this style of practice is to give your hands and brain an ample amount of time to learn what functions have to occur to successfully change chords.

Good luck and have fun!

DavidG.

David G. teaches classical guitar, guitar, music theory and piano in Buffalo, NY.  He received his Bachelor of Music in Music Education from SUNY Fredonia, as well as his Master of Music Performance from University at Buffalo.  Not only is David is a multi-talented musician as a performer and composer, he is also an educator creating a music program called Spectrum Music specializing in Autism & Aspergers.   Learn more about David G. here!

 

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5 replies
  1. John D.
    John D. says:

    None of these are country. Country has meaning. None of these “men” know what a cowboy is, the cowboy struggle, the cowboy strength, and the cowboy’s darkest days. If you want to learn the easiest songs to lean that are real country, it’s
    1. Long Black Limousine by Merle Haggard
    2. El Paso by Marty Robbins
    3. I Saw God Today by George Strait
    3. Tell Lorrie I Love Her by Keith Whitley
    4. He Stopped Loving Her Today by George Jones
    5. Old Rugged Cross by Johnny Cash
    6. Amarillo by Morning by George Strait

    Once you’ve mastered those, you oughta be good enough to choose a new song yourself.

    Reply

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