Guitar Lessons & the Real Recipe for Success

boy playing guitarWhen your child is taking guitar lessons, you’ll quickly learn that the student’s success depends on everyone’s commitment – including parents and teacher. Continue reading as Glendora, CA guitar teacher Lance K. explains this recipe for success…

 

I have always lived by the motto that music should be fun. Part of that fun, however, is becoming proficient on guitar. The best way to achieve the results you desire is through hard work, and hard work requires commitment. Commitment is something that is required from everyone – student, parent, teacher – when signing up for music lessons.

Moms and Dads! The amount of time, money and effort to have a child learn to play the guitar can be substantial. But rest assured the rewards will be worth it when your child performs for the first time.

Music students! It’s not always easy to sit down and practice guitar after school when your friends are out having fun. Someday, however, your friends will be very impressed by your talent and will wish they had spent more time practicing their instrument.

As a guitar teacher it is my job to always be prepared, and make your lessons fun and informative. My commitment to you comes in the form of individualized lessons that are customized to your needs, as every student is different and learns at a different pace. I know I need to be flexible, understanding and ready to adapt.

Much like a recipe in cooking, music lessons need a recipe for success. The recipe in music requires a solid commitment from all three parties: student, parents and teacher. If one ingredient is missing, success will be difficult to achieve. But given the right combination of ingredients, the results can be spectacular! Music is a universal language that you can enjoy for the rest of your life.

Here are some handy tips for parents of music students:

Do…

a. Be aware of the personal value and growth inherent in each musical experience.
b. Let experiences evolve naturally out of the lesson environment
c. Be flexible
d. Make sure to ask questions and understand the material your son or daughter is working on
e. Be sure to get involved be an active participant in the learning process
f. Keep a regular line of communication open between yourself and the instructor

Don’t…

a. Dictate experiences to your son or daughter
b. Stick rigidly to a course of action that is not working
c. Become frustrated when your son or daughter isn’t progressing at the pace you might expect
d. Pressure them to succeed beyond their capabilities

“There’s a difference between interest and commitment. When you’re interested in doing something, you do it only when it’s convenient. When you’re committed to something, you accept no excuses – only results.” – Ken Blanchard

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You might also like…
- What You Can Learn From a Less-Than-Perfect Gig
- 5 Reasons to Fit Jam Sessions Into Your Guitar Lessons
- Playing the Guitar: A New Approach to Practicing

 

Lance K.Lance K. teaches bass guitar, guitar, piano, singing, Flamenco guitar, music recording, music theory, and songwriting lessons to students in Glendora, CA. Lance holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music with an emphasis in guitar, and his specialties include classical, flamenco, rock, blues and jazz styles. Learn more about Lance, or search for a teacher near you!

 

Photo by chris friese

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