How the Best Singers Structure Their Singing Practice [Infographic]

You love to sing and you know how important it is to sing every day, but is all that practice really helping? Here, Brooklyn, NY voice teacher Liz T. shares how to make the most of your singing practice routine…

If you’re not sure how to balance your singing practice routine at home, you’re not alone! Many vocal students get overwhelmed trying to figure out how long to spend warming up, working on vocal technique, and running through songs. While your voice teacher should be your first resource for determining your specific practice routine, I’ve outlined some tips below to get you thinking.

Let’s look at a one-hour voice practice, typically for a high school or college student who is serious about pursuing music, broken into three 20-minute sessions.

20 minutes: Warm-ups

It’s very important that you start your practice singing session off right away with warming up your voice. Just as an athlete warms up his or her muscles and joints before a game or practice, singers need to warm up their vocal cords, tone, and range before a performance or practice. There are many different warm-ups a singer can do, including ones that work on:

– Breath Support

– Low Range/High Range

– Arpeggios

– Diction

– Vibrato

– Head voice/Chest voice

20 minutes: Song study

Use this time to work on that song you are trying to make performance-ready. This time should be spent on:

– Learning the melody and rhythm
Memorizing lyrics, and working on good diction and pronunciation
– Mastering the vocal style and genre of the song, and making sure you are using the appropriate vocal tone
– Making the song your own by incorporating your own musical interpretation and acting technique

20 minutes: Vocal technique

Just as ballet dancers focus on their body technique, by perfecting footsteps, singers must work on their vocal technique by practicing different musical techniques. There are several ways to help you improve your singing, which will require studying and an open mind! These techniques include:

– Improvisation (learning how to scat and sing a blues scale)

– Solfege

– Ear training

– Harmony

Sight reading

Many singers do not take the time to learn these techniques, but the sooner you learn them, the easier they will become. If you can improvise and use solfege in your sight reading, and are proficient in ear training and harmony, you will be at the top of your game!

Are you more of a visual learner? Check out this handy infographic to learn how to break up your singing practice routine for maximum efficiency:

How to Plan Your Singing Practice

Finally, I would suggest taping or recording your voice with an iPhone, computer, or tape recorder, to hear how your voice is progressing each week, month, year, and so on as you’re learning to sing. I hope you take these tips into consideration during your next vocal practice — and if you would like more help on balancing and managing your time, book a vocal lesson with me online today through TakeLessons!

 

LizTPost Author: Liz T. teaches singing lessons in Brooklyn, NY, as well as online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal Performance and currently performs all styles of music. Learn more about Liz here!

 

 

 

Comments

Liam Dahal

December 29, 2017 at 3:51am

I can sing very high notes pretty comfortably but not all the songs I practise have such high notes. If I keep singing songs with low notes for weeks then am I gonna lose my high notes?

Jasper

May 24, 2018 at 11:54am

I don't know the science behind it, but I did experience this. I was singing Don Williams' songs for a while and I came back to sing, bon Jovi and I was struggling.

Luke

December 14, 2018 at 2:20pm

Not necessarily because you are singing low notes, but because while practicing low notes, you probably did not exercise your upper vocals. If you continue to practice both, you should not lose range.

Comments are closed

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