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Is Your Child Ready for Piano Lessons This Infographic Will Help

Quiz: Is Your Child Ready for Piano Lessons?

You’ve no doubt heard about the benefits of music education for kids, often leading to higher math and reading scores, improved memory and concentration, and even higher SAT scores later in life. Plus, learning how to play an instrument is just plain fun!

If your child is already showing an interest in music, perhaps you’re considering signing up for piano lessons, a common introductory instrument for kids. However, you’ll want to consider a few important things before booking the lessons. While there’s no hard-and-fast rule when it comes to the right age for piano lessons, a few factors come into play. The infographic below will help you decide, “Is my child ready for piano lessons?”

Is Your Child Ready for Piano Lessons

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So, how did you do? If you think your child is at the right age for piano lessons, the next step is to find a great piano teacher. Need some help? Begin your search here!  

Not quite there yet? Don’t fret — there are still opportunities to engage your child in music, including playing rhythm games, dancing, and singing along to songs — in the meantime. Music is a lifelong adventure — enjoy it together!

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How to Measure the Success of Your Child’s Piano Lessons

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Piano lessons for kids are an investment — so how do you know your investment is worthwhile? Here are some tips for checking in and making sure your child is learning piano at the right pace, courtesy of Brooklyn, NY teacher Liz T

 

If your child has recently started taking private lessons, there are certain benchmarks you can follow to assess musical progress as he or she is learning piano. Many parents are unaware of how to track and measure their child’s musical abilities. These guidelines will help you understand what level of theory comprehension and performance standards your child and his or her teacher should be striving for in the first year of piano lessons.

First Month

Students should begin learning piano by focusing on the right and the left hands, with their correlating numbers for each finger (1-5). Students should begin reading music with these numbers only. This will help train them how to read music and play the piano comfortably at the same time. Students should practice both the left and right hands, starting with 1-3, their thumbs on middle C, playing the white notes on the keyboard, and then using their 4th and 5th fingers.

Three Months

Now that your child is comfortable with identifying their fingers with numbers, they should be moving on to learning the actual note names on the staff paper. They should be familiar with the lines (Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge) and spaces (FACE) in treble clef and the lines (Good Boys Deserve Fudge Always) and spaces (All Cows Eat Grass) in bass clef, to quickly identify the notes. Students will also start to interpret simple rhythms, such as half notes, whole notes, quarter notes, and so on.

Six Months

At this time students will be introduced to scales, starting with the easier scales (C, G, F). Learning these scales will also help your child become familiar with the accidentals (sharps and flats). The combination of analyzing the correct note names and rhythms will help students learn simple songs to play.

One Year

At this time, students should be comfortable with reading the notes on the page and practicing their scales. This is also a good time to introduce chords, playing multiple notes in the chord triad in the right and left hand. It may take a while for your child to learn chords, depending the size of their hands. Some students love hammering down on the piano playing chords, while others can be intimidated!

 

All students have different learning styles and paces. Depending on the age of your child, these timelines could vary. Some students may hit these target goals months before the average student is expected to comprehend these subjects, while others may need a few more weeks or months to develop their skills. I wish your student all the success, and if you want to make sure your student is on the right track in their piano lessons, find a great teacher today at TakeLessons!

LizTLiz T. teaches singing, acting, and music lessons in Brooklyn, NY, as well as online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

 

 

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5 Things Your Piano Teacher May Not Be Telling You

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Ready to start learning piano? If you’re new to lessons, you might be wondering what to expect. Every teacher is different — some may be more strict, while others may be worried about how they come across to students. Read on St. Augustine, FL teacher Heather L. shares a few insider tips to keep in mind… 

 

There are three kinds of piano teachers. There are those who tell the truth, openly and all the time, those who sugarcoat practically everything, afraid to hurt their students’ feelings, and those who tell only tidbits of the truth. I once read that a teacher who showers his students with only accolades and compliments is like a plumber who comes to your house to repair your sink, but only stands there telling you how beautiful it is. Some things just need to be said in order for you to make improvements and grow. While your piano teacher probably has the very best of intentions, she may not be saying everything she’d like to say. This is a list of five things that your piano teacher may not be telling you.

• You’re just not practicing enough.

Let’s face it — you’ve probably already guessed this one. I’ve met few pianists in my life who practice as much and as long as their teachers would like (most of them are music professors or concert pianists). But think of it this way, unless you practice consistently, all of your time spent on the piano loses a lot of its value. All of the money and energy poured into lessons and recitals may not be totally wasted, but you’re sure not getting what they’re worth.

• You need to be more consistent in your lesson attendance.

Unless you’re taking lessons in an intensive conservatory or from a very old-fashioned person, your teacher is probably fairly understanding of missed lessons that are due to occasional special events, long vacations, and serious illness. But more often, I see a student taking lessons off without rescheduling because he sneezed three times one morning, she stubbed her toe, or he has sports event that he knew about two years ago. Seriously though, so much can be lost as you’re learning piano when your lessons become sporadic. It’s much harder to catch up on your music studies than on your schoolwork. Try to attend lessons regularly, except when you’re contagiously sick or out of town.

• You should consider upgrading your keyboard or tuning your piano.

What’s great about needing a new instrument is that it shows that you’ve been working really hard or you’ve chosen to begin with a new dedication. You might need a new piano or keyboard if it can no longer be tuned, the soundboard is broken, plugs or cords have become unsafe, or the keyboard is not a full 61 keys. On the other hand, you may have a piano that just needs to be tuned. This upgrade can make all the difference in the world to your playing, especially in terms of music theory and ear training.

• Your personal choice of music is not exactly helping your studies.

So I must admit that I do not, even as a classically trained singer and pianist and teacher, listen strictly to classical music and opera in my spare time. I enjoy listening to lots of different genres. But the truth is that much of the reason that I understand and interpret music on a decent level is that I have listened to it a lot, and continue to do so, albeit more occasionally than I have in the past. I don’t like to preach about listening to certain music, but having both your heart and your ears open to the classics might change your playing for the better.

• You are amazing.

For having the courage to face the risks that come with learning anything, especially a performance art, and for making the decision to expand your mind with piano lessons, you are amazing.

In the end, open communication is key to any healthy relationship, even the one with your piano teacher. Be honest and candid with her, and she’ll be at least a little more honest and candid with you. But there might always be five things she’ll never tell you.

HeatherLHeather L. teaches singing, piano, acting, and more in St. Augustine, FL, as well as through online lessons. She is a graduate of the prestigious Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey, and has performed with the New York and Royal Philharmonics, the New Jersey and Virginia Symphonies, the American Boy Choir, and the internationally renowned opera star Andrea Bocelli. Learn more about Heather here!

 

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Are Piano Lessons on DVD Worth It?

Learning To Play The Piano From Watching DVDs.Thinking about purchasing a piano lessons DVD program? Here, Brick, NJ teacher Elizabeth C. shares her thoughts on this method of learning, and if it’s really the best way to go…

You have probably seen the infomercials marketing piano lessons on DVD that guarantee you will be “playing the piano in six weeks or your money back.” These programs may be beneficial in teaching piano basics, but fall short in providing methodology that fosters long-term piano success or song versatility.

Why Piano Lessons DVDs Don’t Always Work

The basis of these “teach yourself” programs is rudimentary. Learn the melody and chords and you can play any song. This is known as reading “lead sheets.” Lead sheets are a form of music notation that provides the musician with just the melody, rhythm, and chords. This method can help a beginner play modern or popular songs from different eras. However, learning to play piano only using lead sheets does not provide you with the ability and knowledge to play some of the standard classics of Beethoven or Mozart, or to transfer this musical knowledge to other instruments.

These programs also leave out a very important factor for any student in any subject: feedback. The instructor on the DVD cannot answer questions, listen to your playing, or offer suggestions or strategies in struggling areas. This type of instruction can only occur when a relationship is developed between you and your teacher. A private teacher can also tailor your program to both ability and musical interest. A private teacher offers a holistic approach to music theory and piano instruction that can translate into an in-depth understanding of music, so that you can build a vast repertoire of piano skills and knowledge.

Investing in Your Learning

We all know the old consumer saying: “You get what you pay for.” You can purchase an inexpensive program to teach yourself piano, or you can invest in a private piano teacher for expertise and life enrichment. The choice is ultimately yours. When choosing between recorded resources or private instruction, keep in mind what you want the end goal to be. What method will be a better return on your investment in the long term?

When I sit at my piano to play, before I touch any keys I always pay homage to my incredibly talented and passionate piano teacher, who patiently taught me all that I know about piano and music. I remember the conversations, the drills, and the recitals. Most importantly I remember her modeling songs to me so that I would one day want to play a song that touched my spirit. I not only developed a relationship with my piano and my music, a lifelong connection was fostered between my teacher and myself.

Relationships between teachers and students are what build success, rigor, accountability, and love in any type of learning. So remember: connecting with a mentor and expert is something that four easy payments of $39.95 for a piano lessons DVD set could never buy!

ElizabethC.Elizabeth C. teaches piano and music theory in Brick, NJ. She received her Bachelor’s of Arts degree from SUNY Oneonta, as well as her Masters of Education from Mercy College. Learn more about Elizabeth C. here!

 

 

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How to Measure the Success of Your Child’s Piano Lessons

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Piano lessons for kids are an investment — so how do you know your investment is worthwhile? Here are some tips for checking in and making sure your child is learning piano at the right pace, courtesy of Brooklyn, NY teacher Liz T

 

If your child has recently started taking private lessons, there are certain benchmarks you can follow to assess musical progress as he or she is learning piano. Many parents are unaware of how to track and measure their child’s musical abilities. These guidelines will help you understand what level of theory comprehension and performance standards your child and his or her teacher should be striving for in the first year of piano lessons.

First Month

Students should begin learning piano by focusing on the right and the left hands, with their correlating numbers for each finger (1-5). Students should begin reading music with these numbers only. This will help train them how to read music and play the piano comfortably at the same time. Students should practice both the left and right hands, starting with 1-3, their thumbs on middle C, playing the white notes on the keyboard, and then using their 4th and 5th fingers.

Three Months

Now that your child is comfortable with identifying their fingers with numbers, they should be moving on to learning the actual note names on the staff paper. They should be familiar with the lines (Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge) and spaces (FACE) in treble clef and the lines (Good Boys Deserve Fudge Always) and spaces (All Cows Eat Grass) in bass clef, to quickly identify the notes. Students will also start to interpret simple rhythms, such as half notes, whole notes, quarter notes, and so on.

Six Months

At this time students will be introduced to scales, starting with the easier scales (C, G, F). Learning these scales will also help your child become familiar with the accidentals (sharps and flats). The combination of analyzing the correct note names and rhythms will help students learn simple songs to play.

One Year

At this time, students should be comfortable with reading the notes on the page and practicing their scales. This is also a good time to introduce chords, playing multiple notes in the chord triad in the right and left hand. It may take a while for your child to learn chords, depending the size of their hands. Some students love hammering down on the piano playing chords, while others can be intimidated!

 

All students have different learning styles and paces. Depending on the age of your child, these timelines could vary. Some students may hit these target goals months before the average student is expected to comprehend these subjects, while others may need a few more weeks or months to develop their skills. I wish your student all the success, and if you want to make sure your student is on the right track in their piano lessons, find a great teacher today at TakeLessons!

LizTLiz T. teaches singing, acting, and music lessons in Brooklyn, NY, as well as online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

 

 

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4 Ways to Balance the Costs of Piano Lessons

7578592916_6be8e96ac7_oInterested in learning to play piano, but worried about the financial commitment involved? Don’t let the cost of piano lessons deter you! Here are some tips for balancing the costs from Brooklyn, NY teacher Liz T

 

Some people may shy away from learning to play piano, thinking the equipment, sheet music, and private lessons are too expensive — but there are many ways you can actually save money and benefit from music lessons at the same time!

Here are some cost-effective ways to learn music and help you balance your budget:

1. Buy a used piano or small keyboard.
Learning to play piano on a grand piano may be nice, but if you do not have the $10,000 or the room in your house for one, don’t worry! I suggest buying a used upright piano — newspapers, Craigslist, schools, churches, and antique shops often sell upright pianos in good condition for reasonable prices. Also, if you are not sure if piano is the right instrument for you or how much you are willing to invest in music lessons, you can buy a small keyboard from Best Buy or Guitar Center anywhere from $100-$200. Here are some great options.

2. Take lessons online.
Many teachers offer affordable, and even lower rates, for taking lessons over Skype. Many teachers have package deals, and offer shorter lessons, such as 30-minute or 15-minute lessons. Learning to play piano online also saves you money, because you won’t have to pay for gas driving to lessons. Additionally, many private schools hold recitals and require yearly fees, whereas you won’t need to worry about that if you’re taking lessons online.

3. Buy and print sheet music online.
There are many affordable online sheet music stores that allow you to print or download certain songs or books by artists/composers for a low price. I suggest Musicnotes or 8notes. Another way to save some money is to put those ear training skills to use! Practice transcribing your favorite song on the radio just by listening and figuring out the chords and melody yourself. You can also save money by making your own staff paper, which can be expensive.

4. Watch videos on YouTube.
Although I would not recommend watching YouTube videos in place of regular lessons, watching piano tutorials is a cost-free activity you should definitely take advantage of to enhance your musical training! There are many videos on YouTube that teachers post, giving master classes, demonstrating new playing and performance techniques, choosing between different brands, and so on, which will all help you become an even better musician!

Please don’t think that taking piano lessons is a large expense. These simple tips will help you balance your budget and learn music at the same time! And don’t worry — the money and time that you do invest working with a great teacher will definitely pay off in the long-run!

LizTLiz T. teaches singing, acting, and music lessons in Brooklyn, NY, as well as online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

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How to Set the Right Goals for Piano Lessons

1102666312_cb1f6f15b8_oExcited about learning piano? Thinking about and setting specific goals is a must-do before you start your lessons. Learn how to set yourself up for success in this guest post by Helendale, CA teacher Sylvia S...

 

You’ve been thinking about learning piano lessons for a while, or maybe you’ve been away from the piano for a while and want a refresher. Maybe your family relocated or your piano teacher retired, got married, or changed to a different career. Whatever happened, you’re ready for your lesson, and you’re ready to set some goals.

So what is a goal?

One person might want to learn to play a favorite song on the piano by the end of summer by practicing for half an hour a day on a family keyboard, because he likes the song and wants to play it for his friends when school starts.

Another person might intensely desire to master both classical and popular music on the piano by practicing on a grand piano in her living room from one to four hours a day, five days a week, over a period of 15 years, because she is from a musical family and wants to make playing piano her career for life.

Finally, we have the average piano student who just wants to learn how to play.

With such a vast range of options, setting a goal for learning piano can seem challenging. Fortunately, even if you haven’t had much success with goal-setting in the past, piano lessons are a great way to learn how! The right goals are S-M-A-R-T:

  • S is for Specific: What kind of piano music would you like to learn? Do you prefer popular songs from the internet or the radio? Do you like instrumental piano music, like classical or New Age? Are you curious about all the details, with a burning desire to learn all about music theory? If you’re a parent, what are your expectations? Do you and your child share the same tastes in music?
  • M is for Measurable: When do you expect to achieve your goal? Are music lessons a long-term investment, or are you just trying things out? Do you value an impressive goal enough to put in months, or even years, to achieve it? Would you prefer simpler, shorter, mini-goals that can be achieved each week?
  • A is for Attainable: Is there a piano or keyboard available for practice in your home? Is there time in your schedule to practice regularly? Are you new to piano, have you been playing for a few years, or is your musical experience on a different instrument? Sharing your ideas for goals with your piano teacher is a great way to open the conversation and work together on creating goals that you can achieve.
  • R is for Rewarding: Why do you want to play piano? Is it that you’ve always loved the sound of the instrument, or that your living room piano is collecting dust? What’s in it for you?
  • T is for Trackable: How will you know when you’ve achieved your goal? Back in the day, the only way to track a budding pianist’s performance was at an annual recital. Fortunately, those days are fading into a dim memory, and practically anyone can record and upload a video with the chance to become a global phenomenon.

Okay, we’ve covered all the letters for S-M-A-R-T. Once you get used to using this acronym, you can use it to help you set goals for practically anything you want to achieve in life, including setting the right kind of goals for learning piano!

SylviaSSylvia S. teaches singing, piano, theater acting, and more in Helendale, CA. She comes from a musical family of several generations, and her experience includes playing an electric keyboard and singing vocals in a professional, working band. Learn more about Sylvia here! 

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4 Surefire Signs You’ve Chosen the Right Piano Teacher

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Want to learn how to play the piano? Not all piano teachers are equal — and different students need different things when it comes to guidance. So how do you know if you’ve found the right teacher? Find out in this guest post by San Antonio, TX teacher Andrew F… 

 

When you go about your search for a piano teacher, what things do you consider? A few important things to consider could be location, experience, and affordability. I could not and would not argue against their certainties, but I think you should also consider something else, if you are not already doing so: connection!

Success at learning to play the piano is not entirely reliant on how good a piano teacher you have. Aside from providing guidance for you while you learn to play the piano, your teacher is also there to help you maintain a desire to keep on practicing.

Knowing whether you have a good connection with your piano teacher only requires self-awareness. The following are some questions I suggest you ask yourself when searching for a piano teacher:

  • Do you look forward to each meeting? Unless it is your chosen reason (for whatever… reason) to receive piano lessons, you should not be feeling reluctance about your next meeting with the teacher. The experience should be inspiring and worthwhile. If you are not looking forward to your meetings you will likely not keep up with assignments given to you, jeopardizing the whole experience! Not looking forward to your meetings with your piano teacher could affect the next important concern I will mention.
  • How has your desire to play piano changed since prior to your first meeting with your piano teacher? As I have mentioned, your piano teacher should help you maintain a desire to play the piano. I believe we piano teachers play various roles, including motivator, coach, inspirer, etc. Playing these roles, we help provide nourishment toward completing your goals as a piano player. It is likely that if you are seeing a negative shift in your desire to play, it is (likely) at least partly due to a lack of a good connection with your piano teacher.
  • Do you feel your teacher is giving you enough insight? Part of what you should look for in a piano teacher is insight. You will want to know such things as how to shape your hands while playing, correct fingering when playing scales, and what pieces best suit you.
  • What is your overall contentment with the experience? If you decide there is no connection, it is nothing to feel bad about nor is it something your teacher should take personally. Just like any other person-centered situation, the alliance between student and teacher is so important to improving your piano playing.

You want to get the most out of each meeting with your teacher. You will know if you have a connection with your piano teacher if the above concerns are really not concerns at all for you. Just remember to be invariably mindful of your experience, because it will benefit both you and your piano teacher. As with every situation in which two-plus entities are working together, communication is important. Ask yourself questions such as the ones mentioned above and get connected!

AndrewFAndrew F. teaches piano, guitar, singing, songwriting, and more in San Antonio, TX. He also tutors in a variety of subjects, with experience working with individuals individually and in groups. Learn more about Andrew here!

 

 

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How to Set Up a Piano Practice Schedule for Your Child

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Is your child’s piano practice falling by the wayside? Make sure he or she continues to get the most out of piano lessons with these practice scheduling tips from Saint Augustine, FL piano teacher Heather L

 

The concern that I hear the most from my students’ parents regarding their children’s piano lessons is practicing and schedules. A parent will tell me, “She’s just not practicing.” The child then replies, “I had so much/many homework/sports games/club meetings that I forgot.” A piano practice schedule helps to solve this challenge.

If a child sees his piano practice as simply another part of his homework time, or even his chore time, then you might find him practicing much more consistently. A child who practices more consistently will be less frustrated with the instrument, and let’s face it, you’ll know that you’re getting your money’s worth out of the lessons. As a reminder, most piano instructors agree that piano practice should generally happen daily, with one day of the week off.

Setting up a piano practice schedule for your little pianist is simple. Here’s a list of easy steps.

1. Take a look at her current schedule.
If you haven’t yet, write out her schedule as it is right now, including all meetings and extracurricular activities. Look for spots where she could use a creative outlet kind of break. Is there one night during the week where she’s swamped with math homework? Does gymnastics practice on Mondays leave her stressed? Making the piano practice session a little longer than usual on these days may help to take the edge off, since playing music has such stress-relieving effects. Who knows? Your pianist might end up really looking forward to extra piano time!

2. Find daily 15-minute increments.
In the practice sessions of child pianists, less is more. It’s been said that human beings’ attention spans, even at their best, last only about 12 minutes. For that reason, I instruct my students to practice for 15 minutes at a time. If your pianist needs or wants to play more, just schedule multiple 15-minute sessions with little breaks in between. These breaks can give the brain a chance to process what’s been done and commit it to memory. In the end, for pianists 10 and younger, I believe that’s it more effective and efficient to practice only 15 minutes six days per week, than an hour or hour and a half once per week. For pianists 11 and older, that session could increase to 30 minutes, in two 15-minute increments, six days per week.

3. Remind and encourage.
Most children need their parents to remind them of their schedules (though sometimes it’s the other way around) and to encourage them lovingly. This helps their process of learning self-discipline and self-motivated. Setting an alarm clock or your smartphone to begin and again to end the practice session, and yet making the session a time of both focus and creativity, helps a lot. Contrary to popular belief, overbearing and harsh discipline often has a detrimental effect, especially when it comes to studying music. Most of the young students who have quit lessons with me over the last decade have quit because their parents have pushed them to the point of frustration and resentment. I believe in setting a high bar for students, but also in balancing high expectations with compassion. Your children will most likely respond with lots of enthusiasm and joy.

4. Record daily practice.
The most successful and experienced teachers and parents that I know are those who keep a daily record of piano practice. Even if it’s just a simple checklist with stickers for each daily practice session, you’ll find that keeping your little pianist accountable, specifically on paper (which he can’t argue with), can start what one could call a practice habit. And that’s exactly what you’re looking for.

The primary goal of a piano practice schedule for your child, though it may take months, is a self-motivated, self-disciplined student whose piano practice is a part of his daily routine. He takes his practice seriously, and yet keeps it all in perspective. Keep a firm sight of that goal, follow these steps, and you’ll get there together.

HeatherLHeather L. teaches singing, piano, acting, and more in Saint Augustine, FL, as well as through online lessons. She is a graduate of the prestigious Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey, and has performed with the New York and Royal Philharmonics, the New Jersey and Virginia Symphonies, the American Boy Choir, and the internationally renowned opera star, Andrea Bocelli. Learn more about Heather here!

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Learn to Play Piano Online | How Do Online Lessons Work?

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Curious about how online piano lessons work, and if they’re right for you? Here, Brooklyn, NY teacher Liz T. shares what to expect as you learn to play piano online…

 

Thanks to technology today, you can learn to play piano online, right from your own living room, with some of the best music teachers anywhere in the US! You may be apprehensive about starting at first, and wondering if learning to play piano online is as effective as taking lessons in person. The answer is yes!

What You Need to Learn Piano Online

To ensure successful online piano lessons, make sure you have a working camera with your computer, a strong internet connection, and good speakers. Place the camera either in front of you or to the side of the piano, so your teacher can see you playing the piano clearly, to make sure you are using correct fingering and posture. Same goes for the speakers — make sure they are positioned so that your teacher can hear you playing!

It’s also important to have a working email you check regularly. I send music and recordings through email often, as well as notify my students about schedule changes. Along with that it’s a good idea to have a working printer for sheet music.

What to Do Before Your Lesson

You’ll want to exchange contact info with your teacher well before the lesson, so you’re not wasting time trying to find each other on Skype. I also suggest doing a trial run a day or two before your first lesson, to make sure Skype and your video camera and sound are all correctly working on your computer.  Then, sign into Skype or the online platform you are using at least 10 minutes before your lesson starts to make sure the program is working then, as well. Same as an in-person lesson, you want to be on time!

If it’s your very first lesson, I tell all my students to have one piece prepared, so I can get a feel for their playing. Of course, your teacher might ask for something else — so that’s why it’s important to chat beforehand!

What to Expect During Your Lessons

I treat my online piano lessons the same as if the student is physically in the room with me. Specific learning schedules and teaching methods may be used by different instructors, but for the most part, the basics of piano are the same.

For beginning piano students, I teach piano playing technique and basic music theory (how to read music, note names, key signatures, rhythms, scales, etc). I start my students off with simple exercises and songs, and incorporate technique and theory into this, so they are ready to tackle pieces in any style!

For my intermediate/advanced players, there is still a heavy emphasis on music theory. I teach my students how to incorporate music theory into their playing, and how to perfect their pieces so that they are performance-ready! I love to challenge my students in learning all styles, such as Classical, Jazz, and Broadway.

What If I Experience Technical Difficulties?

Sometimes there are delays or Skype freezes — just be patient if this happens. Try closing all other programs running on your computer, as this will make it run faster. If for some reason Skype doesn’t work for you, there are other programs you and your teacher can try, like Google Hangouts or Vidyo.

Online piano lessons may not be for everyone, just the same as in-person lessons may not work for everyone. With online lessons, however, you’ll feel comfortable in your own home, have more control over your schedule (since you don’t have to worry about rushing around town to get to a lesson), and have more options for teachers. You can study with professionals anywhere in the US, not just in a 10-mile radius. It’s perfect for students who do not live in a big city, but want to be exposed to top-notch teachers. Pretty cool, huh? As a teacher in NYC, I have online students in California, Ohio, Texas, and Canada!

In the end, the only way you will know which type of lesson is right for you is to give it a try. Browse piano teachers and start your online piano lessons today!

LizTLiz T. teaches online singing, acting, and music lessons. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

 

 

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