4 Tips for Learning Jazz Piano Chords & Chord Progressions

jazz chords pianoReady to add some flair and style to your playing with jazz piano chords? Learning jazz chord progressions is an excellent way to explore a new genre on the keys.

Jazz piano can be a fun but difficult thing to learn. In this article, we’ll break it down by helping you master some essential jazz piano chords. Here are four tips to get you started!

How to Play Jazz Piano Chords & Chord Progressions

1. Know Your Theory

In order to even think about playing jazz piano, your music theory skills have to be strong:

  • Practice playing major seventh, dominant seventh, minor seventh, half and fully diminished seventh chords in root position across the keyboard.
  • Practice major ii V I chord progressions (ii minor 7th, V dominant 7th, and I major 7th) and minor ii V i chord progressions (ii half diminished, V dominant 7th, and i minor 7th) in all 12 keys.
  • Be aware of all the possible chord symbols: Major 7ths (Cmaj7, C△, CM7), Minor 7ths (Cmin7, C-7, Cm7), and half-diminished 7ths (Cmin7♭5, C∅). Luckily, dominant 7ths and fully diminished 7ths only are notated one way (G7 and G° respectively).

2. Know Your Voicings

The root position chords above are great to familiarize yourself with the notes, but don’t smoothly connect the harmonies. In C:
jazz chord progressions piano

To play these jazz chord progressions on the piano smoother, move the least distance to the next chord.

jazz chord progressions piano

Often with smooth voice leading, 7ths in one chord resolve to the 3rd of the next chord. There are many unique sounding jazz voicings to experiment with. Use your ear to be the judge.

To experiment, here are some possible voicings to try out with both major and minor ii-V-I chord progressions.

jazz chord progressions piano jazz chord progressions piano

3. Know Your Extensions

Chordal extensions are harmonies added to 7th chords that add texture, color, and a characteristic jazz sound. In fact, 7th chords are rarely played plainly, but with one or more of these added notes.

As a general rule:

  • Major 7ths, minor 7ths, and dominant 7ths often come with added 6ths and/or 9ths. A 9th is just a 2nd an octave up. The 7th is almost always included in any chord, regardless of what extension is being added. When a 6th is added to a dominant chord, it’s always added above the 7th, creating a “13th” interval. Thus, a 13 chord is a dominant 7th with a sixth added above the 7th (see below). Also note that a plain 9 chord indicates a dominant 7th with a 9th added.

jazz chords pianojazz chords piano

  • Dominant chords (plain 7th chords that often function as the V in a ii  V  I chord progression) sound great with many different extensions. In fact, the 5ths and 9ths of dominant chords can be raised or lowered, leading to many unique harmonic possibilities, including 7♭9, 7#9, 7♭5, 7#5, 7♭9#5, 7♭9♭5, 7#9♭5, and 7#9#5.

jazz chord progressions piano

  • Often, in lead sheets and jazz chord progressions, the dominant extensions above aren’t specified, but can be added to taste. This goes for the 6ths and 9ths in major and minor 7th chords. There are almost always extensions added to 7th chords. Many times the 5th is excluded from the voicing, especially if extensions are added. If it sounds appropriate in the chord progression and leads smoothly to the next chord, it’s probably a great choice.

4. Know How to Practice

The easiest way to become familiar with these jazz piano chords is to practice ii-V-I chord progressions in every key.  Another great resource is playing pre-written arrangements found in books such as Piano Stylings of the Great Standards (Vol. 1-6) by Edward Shanaphy or The Jazz Piano Book by Mark Levine.

These books provide you with many great voicings that are clearly labeled.  And of course, having a quality hard copy full of jazz standards, such as The Real Book by Hal Leonard, is a must for practicing your jazz voicings. Good luck and have fun practicing!

ChrisFPost Author: Chris F. teaches guitar, piano, music theory, and more in Tulsa, OK. He has experience in concert bands, choirs, chamber music groups, jazz combos, and an award winning jazz big band. Learn more about Chris here! 

Interested in Private Lessons?

Search thousands of prescreened teachers for local and live, online lessons. Sign up for safe, affordable private lessons today!

Photo by: Tom Marcello

Tags: , ,
3 replies
  1. PianoGroove
    PianoGroove says:

    Great points made here. Chord extensions are definitely the key to sounding more jazzy on the piano. I always get my students extending major and minor chords up to the 9th to start with and then practice this in both closed and open positions. Being able to visualise the upper extensions of any chord on the keyboard is one of the most important steps in learning jazz piano.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *