german vocabulary list

German Vocabulary List for Back to School

german vocabulary list

Are you planning on studying German this school year? Get a head start with this German vocabulary list created by German teacher Tyler S

It’s that time of year again when students in both the United States and Germany are getting back into the swing of things.

If you plan on studying Germany this year or you’re already taking German lessons, the following German vocabulary list will be indispensable in your studies.

If you take the time to study school-related German vocabulary, you’ll have a much easier time functioning in the classroom.

Wortschatz fürs Klassenzimmer

(Vocabulary for the Classroom)

Memorizing the Germany vocabulary list below will not only improve your comprehension in German, but it will also enable you to strike up a friendly conversation about life in the classroom:

Useful German Phrases for the Classroom

Now it’s time to learn some useful German phrases related to school. Anyone who is taking a German class this school year can benefit from this German vocabulary list.

Here are some common expressions to add to your Wortschatz (vocabulary):

  • In welcher Klasse bist du?” (What grade are you in?)
  • “Ich bin in der zehnten Klasse.” (I’m in 10th grade.)
  • Ich habe die Prüfung bestanden!” (I passed the test!)
  • “Wann ist die Hausaufgabe fällig?” (When is the homework due?)
  • “Mein Lieblingsfach ist…” (My favorite subject is…)

If you want to customize the German phrases above, try inserting a specific subject. Here’s a quick list of the various school subjects.

  • Biologie (Biology)
  • Chemie (Chemistry)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • Erdkunde (Geography)
  • Englisch (English)
  • Geschichte (History)
  • Kunst (Art)
  • Musik (Music)
  • Mathematik (Math)
  • Sport (Physical Education)

The German Grading System

Did you know that grading systems can differ given the country in which they originate? When I was a newly arrived exchange student in Germany, I remember being surprised to learn that the grading system differed from America’s A-F system.

There were two main differences between the two grading systems. First, there is no A-F letter system in Germany because they use numbers instead of letters to represent grades. The number “1”, for example, is the best score you can receive, and a “6” is the equivalent of an “F”.

Secondly, it seemed much more difficult to attain a “1” in a class in Germany than it is to receive an A. As a result, there tend to be less A’s and a much higher level of B’s in a student body.

So, if you are normally an A-student in the United States, don’t be surprised if in Germany you tend to get 2’s. This is simply due to differences in the way German culture grades their students on their work.

This back-to-school German vocabulary list will save you frustration in during your German studies. Studying this list will enable you to have a much easier time participating and understanding your teacher.

Viel Spaß beim Lernen dieses Jahr! (Have a great time learning this year!)

Tyler S.Post Author: Tyler S.
Tyler S. teaches in-person German lessons in Minneapolis, MN. He received his Bachelor’s degree in German and linguistics from the University of Minnesota, and has experience working as a teaching assistant and private tutor with TakeLessons since 2008. What’s more? He can speak 7 different languages! Learn more about Tyler here!

Interested in Private Lessons?

Search thousands of teachers for local and live, online lessons. Sign up for convenient, affordable private lessons today!

Newsletter Sign Up

Tags: , , ,
0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *