Violin Sheet Music: How to Read and Play

How to Read Violin Notes: A Beginner’s Guide

Violin Sheet Music: How to Read and Play

Learning how to read violin sheet music is a challenging but important task.

Being able to read music off of the page unlocks an entire world of musical potential. When you develop your sight-reading skills, playing a new piece of music can be as easy as reading these words.

Playing by ear is a wonderful and valuable skill that can come in handy in many situations, especially when it comes to improvising. However, learning how to read violin sheet music is necessary if you aspire to perform with an orchestra, quartet, or band.

Once you’ve learned how to read violin notes, you’ll be able to play any piece of music you set your mind to. Learning a new piece is exponentially easier when you can interpret the sheet music. The good news is that you can learn how to read music while building up other fundamental violin techniques such as scales, finger positions, and bowing

Below, we will walk you through how to read violin sheet music and then test your knowledge with a quick quiz.

How to Read Violin Sheet Music: Step by Step

The Staff

The journey of learning how to read sheet music starts with the staff. The staff is the set of five horizontal lines on which notes are placed in standard violin sheet music.

There are seven notes of which all music is based: A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Once you get to G, you would start back over with A and the cycle would repeat again, getting higher in pitch as you go up the staff.

There are also multiple pitches that correspond with the same letter in music. For instance, there are several different A’s on the violin. They are just in varying forms of higher or lower pitches.

how to read violin notesThe Notes on the Lines

The easiest way to learn violin music notes is to divide the staff up into lines and spaces.

These are the notes that fall on the lines of the staff, meaning the notes directly on top of the lines, with the lines intersecting them.

how to read violin notes

Starting from the bottom line, begin to memorize each note going up the top line. One popular mnemonic device you may have heard is “Every Good Boy Does Fine.” Another is “Elvis’ Guitar Broke Down Friday.”

These devices can be really handy to help you memorize the notes! You can also start with a beginner violin book, such as Essential Elements for Strings Volume I, which will give you some great exercises to help you memorize and learn these notes.

The Notes on the Spaces

Next, there are the violin music notes that fall in between the lines – on the spaces:

how to read violin notes

Another great mnemonic device applies here. If you look at the notes starting from the bottom note up to the top note, you will see that the letters spell F-A-C-E. And that of course rhymes with space. It’s quite catchy and memorable: “Face is in the space!”

Whenever you’re practicing or working from an exercise book make sure to keep these mnemonic devices in mind. If you forget the name of a note, first determine whether the note falls on a space or a line.

Then take your finger or a pencil and point to each note from the bottom on up, while saying aloud the corresponding mnemonic device to refresh your memory. See, learning how to read violin notes isn’t that hard after all!

RELATED: Beginner’s Guide to Tuning a Violin

Ledger Lines

The five lines and four spaces aren’t quite enough to contain the entire spectrum of violin notes. In order to place these violin music notes, we use small lines or dashes called “ledger lines.” The notes can fall on the lines or in the spaces between them just like the five lines of the staff.

In the G scale chart above, you’ll notice that there are other notes that fall below the staff (lower in pitch) and above the staff (higher in pitch.)

To read these notes you can use the ones on the staff that you already know as a reference point to figure them out.

Important Symbols on the Staff

A very important part of learning how to read violin notes is memorizing the different symbols you might come across on the staff. If you look over some violin sheet music or an exercise book, you’ll notice some new symbols at the beginning of each staff line.
how to read violin notes

The Treble Clef

You may recognize the fancy swirly symbol at the beginning of the staff as a clef. Clef symbols are reference points that name a specific note on the staff from which the names of all the other notes are based.

Lower pitched instruments use other clefs with different reference points, such as bass or alto clef. But in violin (as well as higher pitched instruments such as flute and trumpet) we use the treble clef.

The main thing a beginner should take from this is that if you’re looking at sheet music with a treble clef on it, it signifies that the music is suitable to be played on the violin.

Key Signature

Next, you’ll see the key signature, which is very important to pay attention to because it will tell you whether or not you have any flat or sharp notes in the song.

  • A flat note (i.e. B flat) is a half-step lower in pitch than the base note (B) and is signified by this symbol: ♭
  • A sharp note (i.e. C sharp) is a half-step higher in pitch than the base note (C) and is signified by this symbol: #

how to read violin notes

If you see a flat symbol in the key signature, look at the line or space that is striking through the center of the symbol and determine which note corresponds to the line or space.

Now throughout the duration of the piece (whether it’s a higher or lower version of that note) you will be playing the flat version of that note.

The same goes for when you see a sharp symbol in the key signature. Take a close look at the sharp symbol and notice that there is a little skewed square right in the middle of the symbol.

Whichever note corresponds to the line or space that the square forms around will be the note that will become sharp throughout the piece.

Sometimes there will be multiple sharps or a combination of sharps and flats. If you don’t see any sharps or flats in your key signature, you can just assume that all the notes in the piece are going to be your normal or “natural” notes.

Any notes that are not mentioned in the key signature are assumed to be natural notes as well.

Time Signature

Next in line is the time signature. The time signature lets you know how to count a piece or how many beats are in each measure.

The staff is divided by vertical lines into segments called “measures,” which will contain a certain number of beats depending on what your time signature says.

The top number in the time signature tells you how many beats are in each measure. Once the allotted number of beats have been counted out, it’s time to move on to the next measure and start the counting over again.

The bottom number describes the length of the beat. If you have a 4 on the bottom (most common) that would signify that you are basing your beat off of the length of a quarter note.

These are the numbers you’ll be seeing on the bottom of the time signature and which note lengths they correspond to:

  • 2 = half note
  • 4 = quarter note
  • 8 = eighth note
  • 16 = sixteenth note

These are the most common time signatures you will see:

how to read violin notes

The 4/4 time signature is so common that it is referred to as “common time” and often, you will see a C on the music where the time signature would normally be which means to play the piece in 4/4 time.

SEE ALSO: The Pros and Cons of the Suzuki Method

Quiz Yourself on How to Read Violin Notes

Now that you understand all the symbols and signatures at the beginning of a violin song, you’re ready to start reading notes.

Remembering your mnemonic devices can help you read the notes on the staff, but will you be able to identify the notes that fall off the staff?

As discussed earlier, there are many notes that will fall above the staff and a couple that fall below it.

Just remember that if you know the notes on the staff, you can count up or down using the alphabet to figure out any note you come across.

Test yourself with the chart below.

Starting with the top line, which you know is an F, count up alphabetically to figure out what note this is. Make sure you count each space and line!

how to read violin notes

If you guessed D, you’re right!

Now that you understand the basics of how to read violin notes, you’re ready to start putting it all together. You can now begin to learn about how these notes on written sheet music correspond to the notes on your violin, which is discussed thoroughly in this article.

While we covered a lot of information in this post, online resources such as these are no substitute for a violin teacher. Your teacher can provide you with a personalized, step-by-step approach to mastering how to read violin sheet music, while answering any questions you may have along the way.

If you’re looking to improve your musical skills from the comfort of your own home, online violin lessons are a great option. Your teacher can share their screen and explain the various elements of sheet music in a fun and accessible way. Through real-time feedback, you can develop proper playing habits and make the most out of your time on the instrument.

The time you spend learning how to read music is well worth it. The more you practice, the more the notes will jump off the page and onto your violin!

Post Author: Naomi Cherie S.
Naomi teaches violin in Austin, TX. She is a classically trained violinist with over 20 years of experience and a diverse musical background. Learn more about Naomi Cherie S. here.

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Great Violin Songs to Play

50 Easy Violin Songs for Beginners (That Sound Impressive)

Great Violin Songs to Play

When you’re just starting out on the violin, it’s important that you have some easy violin songs to help you stay motivated and maximize your fun.

Simple violin music can be just as beautiful as its complicated counterparts, and you don’t have to be Paganini to play some expressive and rewarding melodies. Knowing just a handful of notes, you can play tunes from a variety of styles.

If you’re new to violin lessons, your teacher can help you learn some of these beginner violin songs with proper dynamics and technique. With each lesson, you’ll build upon the fundamentals while taking on new material.

Use the following list to discover easy violin music across a variety of genres, including classical, pop, and Irish fiddle. We’ve also included some holiday favorites, as well as the top songs for kids to learn. Read on to find out your new number one violin song!

Easy Violin Songs for Beginners


Easy Fiddle Songs and Celtic Violin Tunes

easy fiddle songs

When it comes to simple fiddle tunes, the traditional Irish and Scottish repertoire contains some of the most iconic songs around. From soaring Celtic anthems to lilting and joyous themes, these simple tunes can pack a serious emotional punch.

Celtic music also heavily influenced the fiddle music of the United States, and many catchy fiddle classics came out of the Appalachians. These are also wonderful songs for beginners to learn. In fact, you may recognize some of the following tunes from the popular country-folk collection!

There are quite a few violin books with traditional (and often easy) Irish songs and fiddling songs. Several of the songs below can be found in “Fiddler’s Philharmonic.” Check out the easy violin sheet music for these songs here.

1. “Bile ‘Em Cabbage Down”

2. “Cripple Creek”
3. “Old Joe Clark”
4. “Arkansas Traveler”
5. Swallowtail Jig”
6. “Si Bheag, Si Mhor”
7. “Scarborough Fair”
8. “St. Anne’s Reel”
9. “Ashokan Farewell”
10. “Oh Susanna”

See Also: The 5 Best Violin Songs of All Time

Easy Violin Songs For Kids

easy violin songs for kids

Do you have a budding violinist at home? If so, then it’s a great idea for them to learn songs they can already sing by heart! When your child practices tunes on the violin that they are already familiar with, they’ll be able to tell which notes are correct and be more motivated to play.

Building confidence is important when your child is first starting out on an instrument, and these simple violin songs make it possible for them to showcase their skills as soon as possible. They’ll be sure to celebrate when they get their first few melodies down!

Note: The songs marked as rounds are particularly fun when you have more than one player or singer, and they allow you to create some relatively simple, beautiful harmonies.

1. “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”

2. “Mary Had a Little Lamb”
3. “Hot Cross Buns (round)”
4. “Go Tell Aunt Rhody”
5. “Frère Jacques” (Brother John – round)
6. “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” (round)”
7. “Have You Seen the Ghost of John” (round)
8. “London Bridge is Falling Down”
9. “Old McDonald Had a Farm”
10. “The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round”
11. “Des Colores” (The Colors)
12. “Los Pollitos Dicen” (The Chicks Say…)

Popular Violin Music for Beginners

Easy Violin Songs for Beginners

If your goal is to perform live for a group someday, playing one of these popular tunes is sure to captivate your audience. The good news is that your big performance doesn’t have to be too far away, since you can quickly learn these sing-alongs!

1. “America the Beautiful”

2. “House of the Rising Sun”
3. “Drink to me Only With Thine Eyes”
4. “Titanic Theme: Wherever you Go”
5. “Little Brown Jug”
6. “Do a Deer”
7. “A Thousand Years”
8. “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”

See Also: 15 Easy Violin Songs That Make You Sound Impressive

Classical Violin Songs for Beginners

Easy Violin Songs for Beginners

Think you have to stick within the pop and folk realm to play beginner violin songs? Then think again. There are plenty of simple violin songs in the classical music repertoire. While the list here attempts to target those pieces that have become more common as solos, there are also many other famous classical melodies from larger works that are easy to play on the violin.

1. “Greensleeves / What Child is This”

2. “Ode to Joy”
3. “Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring”
4. “Bach’s Minuets 1, 2, and 3 in G from the Anna Magdelena Notebook”
5. “Schubert’s Ave Maria”
6. “Amazing Grace”

Easy Christmas Violin Songs

Easy Violin Songs for Beginners

If you’re looking for easy Christmas duets specifically, Christmas Duets for Violin and Other C Instruments by the Hal Leonard Corporation is a great place to look.

If you’re playing alone, you can also play the melody part as a solo. Some of the songs from this book can be found in the list below.

1. “Feliz Navidad”

2. “Hava Naguila”
3. “Oh Hannukah
4. “Happy Birthday to You”
5. “We Three Kings”
6. “Silent Night”
7. “Joy To the World”
8. “Jingle Bells”
9. “Deck the Halls”
10. “Oh Holy Night”
11. “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”
12. “Frosty the Snowman”
13. “Little Drummer Boy”
14. “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen”

Easy Violin Sheet Music

In order to play these songs, you’ll need sheet music! Here are some of the best online resources for violin sheet music:

Violin Videos for Beginners

There are also several helpful YouTube channels that will not only give you the sheet music, but also demonstrate how to play various songs.

If you’re looking for even more videos, this guide has great violin YouTube tutorials.

So, there you have it, our list of easy violin songs that you or your child can play today! You can use this list as a resource until you’re ready to move onto intermediate material. Even as your skills progress, you can return to these easy tunes to warm up or unwind.

The best way to approach the violin is with the help of a teacher. Building proper playing habits is important when starting out, and only a violin instructor can give you the personalized guidance you need to reach your full potential on the instrument.

Even if you’ve hardly touched a bow before, you can use in-person or online violin lessons to get a jumpstart on your musical journey today!

Do you have a favorite violin song? Let us know in the comments below!

Carol BPost Author: Carol Beth L.
Carol Beth teaches violin in San Francisco, CA. She currently plays viola in the San Francisco Civic Orchestra and has been teaching students since 2012. Learn more about Carol Beth!

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easy violin songs

15 Easy (Yet Impressive) Songs to Play on Violin

easy violin pop songs for beginners that impress

As a beginner violinist, chances are you’re eager to play easy violin songs that will show off your new skills. While playing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” is nice, you’re probably looking for some more popular tunes.

Luckily, there are plenty of easy songs to play on the violin, many of which you might already know. Before you jump into learning these violin songs, however, it’s important to make sure your instrument is in tune. Follow the steps in the video below to tune your violin before you begin playing!

Remember, the most impressive performances are a result of lots of practice. Your teacher will provide you with a personalized roadmap to learning the violin, including musical elements such as key signatures, notes, rhythms, and bowings. They’ll also help you avoid the common practicing mistakes many new players make.

If you can find an existing recording of an easy violin song, it’s a great idea to play along with it and listen for things like intonation and rhythm.

Here are 15 easy violin songs in pop, rock, and classical genres to get you started.


Easy Violin Songs: Pop

If you’re looking for some easy, pop violin sheet music for free, websites such as 8Notes have samples of sheet music available at no cost. We’ve also included a link to purchase professional sheet music compilations that contain these popular tunes, including beginner violin sheet music with letters. You’ll find these links alongside the videos below.

Whether you want to impress your friends or just expand your repertoire, these four pop violin songs are a great place to start. While they might not sound like beginner violin songs, these songs are fairly easy to master with some practice. Remember to start slow and focus on intonation, then gradually work the melody up to tempo.

Over The Rainbow


The opening octave in the first measure (low C to high C) is tricky because you have to cross over the D string when going from the G string to the A string. Practice the string crossing first on open strings before you try adding the fingers. Click here for the sheet music.

All About That Bass


If you know the lyrics to this song, definitely sing along as you play as it will help you with the syncopated rhythms. For the Bb to B natural change in the first measure, it’s alright to have an audible slide as that will mimic the vocal line. Click here for easy violin sheet music.

A Whole New World


In this song, the syncopated and quarter note triplet rhythms can be confusing at first. Try playing along with a recording of the song to see if you can hear how those rhythms are played. You can even sing along while you play if that helps. Click here for the sheet music.

Old Joe Clark


This fiddle tune sounds impressive when you play it fast, but it’s not very difficult because of all the repeated notes. Practice the rhythmic pattern on open strings first to make sure you feel it in your bow arm, then add the written notes. Click here for the easy violin sheet music.

SEE ALSO: THE 5 BEST VIOLIN SONGS OF ALL TIME


Easy Violin Songs: Rock

Are you ready to rock out with these classic tunes? These beginner songs to play on violin are sure to “wow” your rock ’n’ roll audience. Use the simple tips below to help you perfect any of these violin songs, and don’t forget to jam along with the recordings!

Another One Bites The Dust


The 16th notes in this song are tricky, but if you spend some time counting and clapping the rhythm, you’ll know it cold. You could also practice singing the lyrics, as they have the rhythm built into them. Click here for the sheet music.

Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds


Watch out for the key change and time signature change in this piece. The feel of the music changes when going from 3/4 to 4/4, so try clapping the two meters first, making an accent on the first beat of each measure. Click here for the sheet music.

She Loves You


This is a fast song, but don’t try to play it fast right away. For the syncopated sections, try counting and clapping them first to make sure you understand the rhythm. It’s ok to clap them slowly at first and then work up the speed over a bunch of repetitions. Click here for the sheet music.

Stairway To Heaven


In the opening section, use fourth finger for the high E (instead of the E string) because you don’t have any notes higher than E. Practice those G to A slurs to make sure your bow arm is creating the slur cleanly between the D and A strings. Click here for the violin sheet music.

Hotel California


In the verse, the rhythm for each phrase can be slightly different. If you’re just playing for fun, don’t be afraid to simplify the rhythms a bit, or repeat just one verse. In the chorus, try to mimic the vocal echo on “such a lovely place” and “any time of year” by playing the first time loud and the second time soft. Click here for the violin sheet music.


Easy Violin Songs: Classical

These easy classical songs to play on violin are perfect for your first performance. Not only do these beginner violin songs sound beautiful, but they are fairly easy to perfect. Again, use the helpful tips below to guide you throughout your practice.

Minuet 2


The opening arpeggio in this Bach piece sounds impressive if you can play it cleanly. Practice it slowly first to feel where the bow changes strings. If you move your bow arm too much, you’ll overshoot the A string on your way to the E string. Click here for the violin sheet music.

Hunter’s Chorus


Have fun with the 16th notes in this piece. They add excitement and vitality to the song. The string changes on the 16th notes are tricky to line with your left hand fingers, so be sure to practice them slowly at first. Really dig into the accents in the second half of the piece. Click here for the violin sheet music.

Fanfare Minuet


The repeated notes in this song let you play faster than in other songs. Challenge yourself to play all the eighth notes cleanly, and to make distinct accents. Click here for the sheet music.

Morning Has Broken


The three-note slurs in this piece can be tricky, especially the ones that include string changes. Isolate the parts of the slurs that are hardest and make a little exercise for yourself that you can do as part of your warm up. Click here for the sheet music.

What Child Is This


This is a great song to practice legato playing, as well a playing with two flats. Remember to use your fourth finger on the A string to play the high Eb’s. Click here for the violin sheet music.

Your Own Unique Songs

In addition to the popular tunes we’ve explored above, everyone has their own favorites. Look within your community to find songs that are meaningful to your friends and loved ones, and then have them all sing along as you play. From Celtic anthem fiddling to simple violin notes for Tamil songs, these four-stringed instruments play an important role in cultures around the globe.

What easy songs to play on violin are favorites in your culture or community? Let us know in the comments below!

Ready for More Songs to Play on Violin?

Playing the violin should be fun, so when you’re just starting out, stick with learning easy violin music that is appealing to you. Once you’ve practiced hard and learned a new song, share it with your family and friends by making a video or audio recording. You can even learn a few beginner violin songs and invite some of your supporters over for a mini violin performance!

Though these videos are a great resource for learning new violin tunes, the best way to expand your musical knowledge is through violin lessons. Studying with a professional teacher is a must for making the most out of the violin, no matter what style you want to play.

Looking for even more songs to play? Check out these 50 easy songs to play on violin.

25+ Fascinating Violin Facts That Will Surprise You

violin facts

Looking for fun violin facts? Here, you’ll find the 25 most interesting facts about the violin we could round up!

People have spent their entire lives studying the possible benefits of playing the violin, its history, and how it functions. Enjoy exploring some of their findings in this short list of violin facts.

25 Interesting Violin Facts

violin facts

(This infographic was made by our friends at Venngage).

Interesting Facts About the Violin – In Detail

  1. Most people consider playing the violin an intellectual pursuit. However, a violinist can burn around 170 calories per hour. That’s equivalent to about one soft drink!
  2. Based on research measuring the different levels of cognitive processing, violinists have shown to develop faster processing speeds compared to the average person who does not play an instrument.
  3. Even though the exact year the violin was officially created is a mystery, we do know that the design of the modern violin is over 500 years old. While the violin hasn’t changed much over that time, the bow and other accessories have gone through many changes.
  4. Italy is primarily attributed with the creation of the modern violin. A lot of Italian makers, such as Stradivari, lived and worked in the small town of Cremona, creating some of the world’s oldest and most valuable violins.
  5. The word “violin” comes from the medieval Latin word vitula. What makes this one of the funniest violin facts is that oddly enough, the modern Latin translation of vitula also means “female cow.”
  6. String players, like violinists, tend to have larger brains. This is due in part to the complex motor skills and reasoning required to play the instrument.
  7. The main body of the modern violin contains 70 different parts. In high quality instruments, these parts are all made from a variety of woods.
  8. Famous violinist Fritz Kreisler served in WWI as a captain. His aural sensitivity, developed by playing the violin, allowed him to determine the location of large artillery by listening to the changing pitch of incoming shells across the battlefield.
  9. The violin was the leader of the orchestra before conductors became a main fixture. Prominent composers would often conduct their orchestral arrangements from the first violin chair or the concertmaster position.
  10. Even though Mozart was a prominent pianist and composer, he also played the violin. In fact, Mozart’s father began his son’s musical training on the violin.
  11. The modern violin was developed largely by Gasparo da Salò, Andrea Amati, and Antonio Stradivari, all of which lived in Italy during the 17th century.
  12. The violin has ancestral ties to the Byzantine empire through its distant cousin, the lyra. This archaic instrument evolved into the “rebec” and then the medieval fiddle, before finally transforming into the modern violin.
  13. The violin has become an essential instrument in cultures all over the world, from Ireland to India. Some of these cultures have developed different ways of playing the instrument. One of the most interesting violin facts is that some Indian players sit cross-legged while playing, and rest the scroll on their feet with the bottom of the violin under their chin!
  14. The parts of the brain that are responsible for the left and right hand are more sensitive in violinists. This means that violinists have greater conscious control over more areas of their hands.
  15. Some of the most popular careers for violinists include teaching, and performing in orchestras or other small groups. Highly sought after orchestral positions are extremely difficult to obtain.
  16. In 1626, King Louis XIII of France created an orchestra, Les 24 Violons du Roi. This helped launch the violin into prominence for the first time in history.
  17. Violinist Niccolò Paganini was one of the first musicians to pioneer the “rock star” image. His revolutionary compositional style and playing inspired many other performers and composers such as Liszt, Schumann, Brahms, and Rachmaninoff.
  18. Many violin facts show that playing the instrument has a significant impact on the mind. A study from Harvard University found that early training in the violin improves a myriad of cognitive skills including memory, nonverbal reasoning, and attention.
  19. The rich sound of the violin partially comes from a small dowel inside the instrument beneath the bridge, called the “sound post.” It does this by receiving the vibrations, created by the strings, from the bridge and transmitting them to the back of the violin.
  20. The most expensive violin ever purchased by a private investor was acquired for $16 million dollars. However, The Ashmolean Museum currently owns an estimated $20 million violin.
  21. Despite contracting polio as child, famous violinist Itzhak Perlman rose to prominence and is now one of the best violinists in the world. In fact, Perlman was honored in 2016 when he was asked to perform at President Obama’s inauguration.
  22. The violin and fiddle are the same instrument. Even though the term “violin” is more often used in connection with classical music, and the “fiddle” with Irish or folk music, they are in fact the same.
  23. Researchers studying the brain’s plasticity often use violinists to examine how much the brain can adapt.
  24. YouTube sensation and violinist Lindsey Stirling has over 10.5 million subscribers. Her most watched video, “Crystallize,” has over 194 million views.
  25. Want even more shocking violin facts? Violin strings were originally made from the dried intestines of cats and other animals! Nowadays the strings are made from a combination of synthetic materials and a variety of metals.
  26. The violin bow was originally shaped like a hunting bow. This changed in the 19th century when François Tourte perfected the modern bow by creating a concave curve.

These are just a few of the most interesting facts about the violin, but there are so many other wonderful things to learn. If any of these violin facts sparked your interest, or if you’ve always wanted to play the violin, check out the spectacular teachers at TakeLessons.

The violin is one of the most challenging and rewarding instruments you can learn. It is also one of the few instruments capable of matching the diversity and complexity of the human voice. Know any more interesting facts about the violin? Leave a comment below!

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Sources:

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  • “These Are The 12 Most Expensive Violins Of All Time.” CMUSE, 6 Sept. 2017, www.cmuse.org/12-most-expensive-violins/
Violin or Cello

Violin or Cello: Which Instrument Is Right For You?

Violin or Cello

Choosing whether to play the violin or cello can be difficult, but this article will help you consider the advantages and disadvantages of each. 

The violin and cello are two of the most well-known and commonly studied instruments in the string family. Each one is central to the makeup of the orchestra we know today. Becoming familiar with the pros and cons of these two instruments will help you decide whether the violin or cello is a better fit for you.

Violin or Cello – How to Decide

Pros and Cons of the Violin

The violin’s most commonly cited advantage is that it’s practical. The violin is (on average) significantly less expensive than the cello. It’s also smaller and more portable. In addition, many people appreciate the violin’s range and tone, which is similar to that of the human voice.

Because the instrument has been popular now for around 400 years, there isn’t a shortage of repertoire to keep both budding and experienced violinists challenged. Within orchestras, spaces for violinists also tend to be the most numerous, so in that sense violinists have an advantage (especially over winds, brass, and percussion).

Compared to other string sections however, violin can also be more competitive because so many people play it. It might not be too difficult to earn a spot in the second violin section, but earning a place among the upper ranks can be more difficult.

Pros and Cons of the Cello

The cello is often cited for its practical disadvantages – mainly its size and expense. But for students who enjoy the sound of the cello more, hauling around a larger and more expensive instrument is well worth the care and effort.

The cello’s low register and tonality resonates with many musicians far more than the violin’s higher register.

Both the violin and cello have a unique range and repertoire that tend to draw different people. While violin repertoire is probably more extensive, the cello also has a well-established and diverse repertoire, including significant solo works.

Fewer students study the cello than the violin, so cellists are usually in higher demand than violinists. This tends to hold true even when taking into account the typically lower number of cellists required to create an orchestra or chamber ensemble.

Which is Harder to Play: Violin or Cello?

Many students wonder, which instrument is more difficult: the violin or cello? People who have tried both instruments tend to say the cello is less difficult due to its more natural position. The position of the violin can feel awkward at first, however advanced violinists insist that it becomes natural over time.

Many experienced musicians say that both instruments have their own difficulties. For example, although a cellist’s playing position is easier to learn, the thumb position on the cello is difficult for many students. Advanced cellists also must learn three clefs instead of just one.

SEE ALSO: How Easy is it to Switch Instruments? [Infographic]

Making the Choice Between Violin or Cello

Music students and their families can do a number of things to help them in their decision between the violin or cello.

  • First, consider what opportunities are available at school or in the community. Keep long term goals in mind.
  • Make sure the student has exposure to both instruments. This can include videos, CDs, or local concerts. Local colleges and conservatories often perform concerts for the general public and many of these feature the violin and cello. Local symphonies also put on free concerts in the park.
  • To be sure you’re making the right choice, it’s always a good idea to sample each instrument and take a couple lessons. Check out this directory of violin teachers, and this directory of cello teachers. Lessons are available both in-person and online all over the country.
  • Above all, the student should love the sound of whichever instrument they choose, whether it’s the higher and more cheerful violin or the deeper and rich cello.

What are your thoughts on whether the violin or cello is a better instrument? Let us know in the comments below!

Carol
Post Author: Carol Beth L.
Carol Beth L. teaches viola and violin in Sacramento, CA. She currently plays viola in the Rancho Cordova Civic Light Orchestra and has been teaching students since 2012. Learn more about Carol Beth here!

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improve violin tone

5 Ways Your Bowing Technique Affects Your Violin Tone [Video]

improve violin tone

Dreaming about a smooth beautiful violin tone? For beginners, it’ll take some practice to perfect your bowing technique and stop the “squeak.” Here, violin teacher Naomi Cherie S. shares a few tips…

So you’ve learned the basics on your violin. You know how to hold the violin and the bow, you’ve learned where all the notes are, and you’re getting pretty good at reading notes and rhythms. But… your playing still isn’t sounding that great. It’s squeaky, inconsistent, and patchy-sounding, and you’re just not sure what to do to fix it.

If this sounds familiar, we’ve whipped up a list of tips and tricks to perfect your bowing technique, which in turn will improve your tone. Just remember, these aren’t quick fixes. But if you stick with them and practice often, you’ll start to notice great improvements!

To get started, check out this quick summary of five ways your bowing technique affects your tone. Then keep reading below for even more tips!

Bowing Technique Problem: Holding Your Bow Incorrectly

You may have had some basic training on how to hold your violin bow, or maybe you’re self-taught. Either way, it’s a good idea to go through your bow hold and make sure each finger is positioned correctly.

Even if you’ve perfected your bow hold from the start, over time your fingers can creep out of place and cause issues. It’s important to remember that the way you hold your bow has a great impact on your sound, so constantly check in to make sure you haven’t developed any bad habits. Here are the basics on proper bow hold:

  • Your thumb goes on the little rounded bump you see on the black part of the bow, and should be flush up against your thumbnail. Your thumb should be bent.
  • Your first finger wraps around the grip (the plastic or leather part that wraps around the stick near the frog) and should bend at the main knuckle to hook onto the bow stick firmly.
  • Your middle finger sits on the frog. Make sure your finger wraps around the frog and reaches down to the bottom edge of the frog where it squares off.
  • Your ring finger goes right next to your middle finger and should cover the white spot that’s on your frog. It should also wrap around the frog, along with your middle finger.
  • Last but not least — your pinky is very important for balance and sits right on top of the stick. Make sure to place it on the wood, not the metal screw at the end of the bow. Watch to make sure that your little finger, like all of your other fingers, is curved.

Visual learners, check out this guide to holding a violin bow for more details.

Bowing Technique Problem: Not Bowing Straight

Playing with a straight bow is the another major factor that will impact your sound. Watch some videos online of professionals in orchestras, or soloists. Are their bows straight, parallel with the end of the fingerboard and the line that the bridge makes? Or is it making a diagonal line? Odds are, it’s straight for the majority of their performance. This is a huge goal to master as a beginner.

Here are some tips to ensure you’re bowing straight:

  • Practice in front of a mirror daily and watch to see whether you are playing from your shoulder or from your elbow. You should be playing from the elbow, opening and closing it like a hinge; leave your shoulder as still as you can.
  • Try the “wall trick”: Lean up against a flat wall so that the area on your arm from your shoulder to your elbow is flat up against the wall. This will force your shoulder and elbow to stay still. Once you get used to the feeling, back away from the wall and see if you can hold the position. Do this several times a day, and check a mirror to make sure you stay in that position.
  • Imagine you’re driving the bow hairs across the strings as if there were an invisible road laid out straight over a slightly curved hill. What would happen if the car tires went diagonally on a slippery road? You might hear a screech — same sound your violin makes when you play with a crooked bow!

Bowing Technique Problem: The “Bouncing Bow”

If you’re a beginner violinist, you know what I mean when I say “bow bouncing problems.” This is a common issue, even for people who’ve been playing for a while.

Here are some tips to combat it:

  • Think of your first finger as a hook that can dig the bow into the violin string to absorb bow bounciness. When the bow starts to bounce, lean your first finger into the stick to deaden the vibration and smooth out the stroke. (This is a good trick if you’re in the middle of a performance and you need an immediate fix when you feel your bow starting to bounce!)
  • Experiment with varying pressure from your first finger to the bow stick through to the violin string. You’ll notice that if you dig into the string too hard you’ll get a gritty abrasive tone, and if you press too light you’ll get a patchy, inconsistent tone. Look for the middle ground.

Bowing Technique Problem: Uncontrolled Bowing

If your bow strokes feel and sound out of control, take a step back and use small bow strokes instead. Consider starting with about five inches of bow. The area of bow near the frog is closest to your hand (the bow’s main power source) and can come off sounding too harsh or heavy-handed; the tip of your bow is farthest from the power source, so it can sound weak and be hard to control. The middle of the bow is the safest zone to play in.

Playing with tiny bow strokes may feel silly at first, but hearing your instrument sound a bit more under control can give the confidence boost you need. Once you feel like you’re sounding more stable, gradually increase your bow span. You may want to do this exercise over the course of a few days or weeks until you start to feel more comfortable.

Bowing Technique Problem: The Tipped Bow

Beginners sometimes tilt their bow forward or backward, so that only some of the hairs run across the strings. For a thick, even tone, flatten your bow so that all of the hairs are touching the strings. This will ensure that you get a full tone. This also helps the bow balance on the strings.

Apply these five major tips to your everyday practice, and you will see and hear great results with time. Have fun exploring your violin, and be sure to check out my profile if you’re interested in online violin lessons with me!

Post Author: Naomi Cherie S.
Naomi teaches violin lessons online. She is a classically trained violinist with more than 20 years of experience and a diverse musical background. Learn more about Naomi Cherie S. here.

 

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learn violin

Pinspiration: 13 Fantastic Pinterest Boards to Help You Learn Violin

learn violin

Believe it or not, Pinterest is one of the best online resources for all things violin! From pictures, charts, and tutorials, to infographics, how-to guides, and video lessons, it’s an amazing place to find instruction and inspiration. Here, music instructor Julie P. brings you 13 awesome Pinterest boards to help you learn violin…

Learning violin can be challenging and sometimes, you can use a little inspiration to keep you going. It may seem like you’re making slow progress, but if you keep working, you can learn to play the violin!

If you didn’t already know, Pinterest is a fantastic place to learn violin, if you know who to follow!

From violin inspiration to sheet music and tutorials, here are 13 Pinterest boards to help you learn violin!


Violin

by Allyson

learn violin

This board features helpful articles about specific topics to help you learn violin. There are practice guides and easy-to-follow tutorials.

You will find inspiration and entertainment through beautiful pictures of fine violins, performance videos, and beginner sheet music and tips.


Violinists

By Catherine Blankenship

learn violin
Look through hundreds of beautiful pictures of violinists of all ages.

You can discover new artists and learn about your favorite violinists. Plus, if you picture yourself like the people on this board, you’ll be back in the practice room in no time!


Violin

By Chelsea Hopkins

learn violin
Check out this board for a mix of articles, instructional videos, and infographics.

There are also lots of pictures and helpful tips for both new violinists and intermediate players.


The Violin Player

By Lorene Lash

learn violin
When you’re learning violin, it can be fun to know a little bit about the instrument’s origins.

Learn about the violin through this board by Lorene Lash.

Pins also include artwork featuring famous violinists.


Violin

By Lishno W.

learn violin
If you’re a beginner, follow this board for violin songs and fun activities.

Violin practice should be fun, so use this board to spice up your routine!


Learning the Violin!

By Molly H

learn violin

Learning the Violin by Molly H. is packed with exercises, articles, and tips to learn violin.

It also has a bunch of easy, beginner-friendly sheet music.


Violin

By XxNikki TurleyxX

learn violin

Looking for pop, rock and movie sheet music? Check out these pins to learn some new tunes!


Learn to Play the Violin

By Revelle Strings Violins

learn violin

This board is like an FAQ page for learning the violin.

If you have questions about what kind of violin you should buy, how to get started, the benefits of playing the violin, or how to stay motivated, you will find answers here with this board from Connolly Music.


Violin

By Lauryn Gibbs

learn violin

Lauryn Gibbs put together an awesome smorgasbord of violin inspiration!

There are fun, artsy pictures, videos of violin pop covers, inspirational quotes, and violin humor.


Learning to Play the Violin

By Sissy Bates

learn violin

This board is packed with helpful how-to guides. You can learn how to tune your violin and  read about proper care and maintenance.

There are also tutorials where you can learn different violin techniques like vibrato and shifting, and helpful tips to find the right violin for you.


Violin, Music Learning

By Noell R.

learn violin

Violin, Music Learning has a good mix of tutorials, practice tips, inspiration, and fun.

If you play any other instruments or are interested in other music topics, you will find lots of helpful resources.


Violin Tutorials

By MJStreetTeam

learn violin

If you’re working on your bow hold or want to master important violin techniques, Violin Tutorials is the board for you.

From video tutorials to lessons, you can find an easy-to-follow guide to help you boost your violin skills.


Learning the Violin

By Katelyn Lucas

learn violin

From sheet music to infographics and guides, Learning the Violin is a great Pinterest board for beginners.

You can find charts to help you learn proper finger placement, infographics on the parts of the violin, and sheet music to help you learn new songs.


When you check out these boards, you’ll be itching to get back in the practice room! The more you practice, the more you can do with the violin, so get inspired and then get to work!

Which violin boards do you follow on Pinterest? Let us know in the comments below! 

JuliePPost Author: Julie P.
Julie P. teaches flute, clarinet, music theory, and saxophone lessons in Brooklyn, NY. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from Ithaca College and her Masters in Music Performance from New Jersey City University. Learn more about Julie here!

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Play Like the Pros: 5 Techniques You Can Learn From Famous Violinists

famous violinists

Don’t just watch your favorite famous violinists, learn from them! Here, music instructor Julie P. shows you the violin techniques you can learn from watching famous violinists…

You have probably seen videos of famous violinists on YouTube and various violin blogs. In fact, these videos may have inspired you to pick up a violin and take lessons.

Want to know the best part?

While these videos are inspiring and entertaining, they’re also educational. You can learn important violin techniques by watching the masters at work!

So grab your violin and your computer, and get ready to watch and learn. Here’s what you can pick up from five famous violinists.


Lindsay Stirling

Stage Presence

Lindsay Stirling is a talented violinist who enjoys her craft and adds her own style.

The famous female violinist combines playing with acting, dancing, and storytelling. The result is a pop-infused violin party.

Her performances are great examples of stage presence and how to enjoy playing the violin. Lindsey is an inspiration to dance to the beat of your own drum and make you dreams come true!


Mark O’Connor

Fast Bowing

Want to learn how to bow super fast? Mark O’Connor shows you how it’s done in this video of “Orange Blossom Special.”

He plays 16th notes at  breakneck speeds with incredible bow technique. Watch his right arm work as one unit, supporting his bow hand.

Also, notice how his right-hand fingers stay relaxed and don’t tense up. His playing is efficient, with no wasted movements.

Want to improve your finger strength? Try these exercises!


David Oistrakh

Projecting Your Sound

In this video, David Oistrakh plays the Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto,” and has no problem projecting over the orchestra.

Watch how he uses his entire bow and a fast bow speed to create more sound. Even on shorter notes, he uses a lot of the bow length to create his enormous sound. His right hand is sometimes just a blur!

His bowing engages his whole arm, which allows him to bow with speed and power without taxing his bow hand.


Taylor Davis

Creativity / Brand

For you aspiring violinists, the internet is full of potential fans, if you can find the right way to engage them. Another famous female violinist, Taylor Davis, has made her mark with a YouTube channel full of videos of her performing video game and movie music.

The millions of views have allowed her to release multiple albums and go on tour. Taylor loves playing this music, so she used her creativity to build a full brand around it.

In this video, she plays music from Pirates of the Caribbean, you can see how she has crafted a full video experience with costuming, staging, and a dynamic accompaniment.

You can learn even more about Taylor in this Q&A she did for us at TakeLessons!


Jerusalem Quartet

Communication

Watching string quartets, like the Jerusalem Quartet, is great a great way to learn about communication between musicians, which is important if you want to play with other performers or in an orchestra.

In this video, notice how the Jerusalem Quartet moves to the music, look up at each other, and gesture at various points in the music.

Solid communication will help you have a smooth performance!


The more you watch famous violinists, the more you will learn. When you find a video you like, watch it several times; you’ll notice new violin techniques each time.

Besides videos and lessons, there are lots of helpful violin resources available online. Take advantage of these materials and use them to boost your violin skills!

JuliePPost Author: Julie P.
Julie P. teaches flute, clarinet, music theory, and saxophone lessons in Brooklyn, NY. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from Ithaca College and her Masters in Music Performance from New Jersey City University. Learn more about Julie here!

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violin bow hold

Product Review: Master Your Violin Bow Hold With Bow Hold Buddies

violin bow hold

Are you struggling with your violin bow hold? While it’s one of the most important aspects of your technique, it can be a challenge for new violin players. Here, violin teacher Naomi Cherie S. reviews Bow Hold Buddies, a product designed to improve your violin bow hold..

If you’re a beginner or you’re having trouble with your violin bow hold, I recommend checking out a product I recently heard about called Bow Hold Buddies.

proper violin bow hold is essential to your foundation as a budding player. Holding the bow in a very specific, time-tested way will impact the quality of the tone you produce.

The proper violin bow hold can also be one of the hardest feats for a beginner to accomplish, as it requires a very specific set of muscles and hand positioning.

With practice and exercise, students can usually pick it up within a few months, but some students, especially young children, have a harder time than others.


Bow Hold Buddies

violin bow hold

Image courtesy Things4Strings

Enter Bow Hold Buddies, a unique device that fits on your bow and guides your hand into place for the perfect violin bow hold. Ruth Brons created Bow Hold Buddies to help her beginner violin students.

“My beginners love getting off to a quick start and I  value optimizing lesson time,” Brons says. “Because I do not have to correct the bow hold multiple times in each lesson, which is both time consuming and frustrating, students are able to move through and master those first couple of method books so much more quickly and easily.”

I got the chance to test the Bow Hold Buddies product myself, and I even tried it out with some of my students. Read on to see the results!


The Results

Installation

The Bow Hold Buddies device is fairly easy to install and use.

I was a little unsure at first when reading the pictogram on the instructions, so I definitely recommend watching the short video where the creator explains exactly how to use the product.

Bow Hold Buddies are lightweight, smart, and cute. They come in animal shapes including a frog, a fish, and an elephant, which makes them perfect for kids and adults, and the adjustable design can adapt to any hand size.

How it Works

violin bow hold

While there are several exercises you can do to improve your violin bow hold, this device eliminates confusion and shows you exactly where to place your fingers.

Since it covers most of the areas where your fingers shouldn’t be, your fingers will easily to slip into place in the right spots!

As one of my adult students said, “Now I can see everything I was doing wrong before. It’s almost as if you can’t put your fingers in the wrong spots.”

See Also: Violin Bow Hold for Beginners


Conclusion

All in all, I’d recommend this product to anyone who’s just starting out, but like any DIY or commercial violin training device, only as a temporary tool.

Bow Hold Buddies are kind of like training wheels on a bike: they will help you get started, but you shouldn’t use them forever.

Having even the slightest bit of extra weight on the bow can reduce your control and overall tone quality. Therefore, while I highly recommend this product, I suggest you use it until your hand adjusts and you can keep your violin bow hold in place without struggling.

I’d also suggest alternating between playing with the device and playing without it. For instance, try practicing with the Bow Hold Buddies for 20 minutes, then take them off and see how you do.

When you practice on your own, watch closely, and take note of how your muscle memory is working and improving a little bit each time you practice.

For even more ways to improve your violin bow hold, try these exercises!

Props to Things4Strings for their creativity and ingenuity on this product! I definitely haven’t seen anything else like it. Make sure to check out the other useful tools for cello and violin at Things4Strings.

If you’re struggling with your violin bow hold, make sure to ask your violin teacher for help! 

Post Author: Naomi Cherie S.
Naomi teaches violin in Austin, TX. She is a classically trained violinist with over 20 years of experience and a diverse musical background. Learn more about Naomi Cherie S. here.

Image courtesy joeannenah

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violin solos

The Ultimate List of Violin Solos [Video Tutorials]

violin solos

Whether you’re a beginner or an advanced violinist, it’s important to be armed with a number of solo pieces to play. Here, violin teacher Naomi Cherie S. put together an in-depth guide to violin solos for players of all levels…

With thousands of pieces to choose from, the world of music can be overwhelming! In this handy reference guide, we’ve picked some of our favorite violin solos and categorized them according to skill and experience level.

From easy songs to intermediate selections and some great choices for auditions, we’ve g
ot something for everyone!


Easy Violin Solos

 “Minuet No. 1”- J.S. Bach

This is a great solo for a beginner who’s been playing for six months to a year. It’s a step up from the common early beginner folk songs, and a great introduction to classical music from Baroque-era composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

It keeps it short and simple but adds some complex rhythms and stylistic bowings.


“Minuet No. 2” – J.S. Bach

This song is a nice next level piece that takes things up a notch. The second in this series of Bach Minuets, it follows the same style and themes but increases playing stamina with length, and couples familiarity with a few new twists and turns.


 “Gavotte” – F.J. Gossec

This is a simple yet challenging beginner solo. It’s playful and lighthearted style will  impress friends and family or an audience at a recital.

It adds complexity, and again, pushes your stamina, which is a big factor when you’re starting out and getting used to playing for longer periods of time.

Looking for more beginner-friendly solos? Check out these 14 popular violin solo pieces for beginners!


Intermediate Violin Solos

“Gavotte” from Mignon – A. Thomas

This is a great choice for an intermediate violinist who has been playing for around one-and-a-half to two years.

It’s lively, melodic themes give it spark, and it’s a great segway piece for those transitioning from beginner to intermediate.


 “Minuet in G” – L. van Beethoven

This solo is a wonderful introduction to the music of legendary composer Ludwig Van Beethoven. Sitting right on the border between the classical and romantic eras, Beethoven’s lush and rich melodies are  indicative of the time period he helped define.


“Minuet” – L. Boccherini

You’ll probably recognize this one from television commercials and films. Luigi Boccherini’s “Minuet” is a great song to play at a recital.

This infectious tune will get heads bobbing and toes tapping.


Violin Solos for Auditions

“Student Concertino” – A. Huber

This three-page Concertino is a great audition choice for a student who has been playing for two to three years. It’s a longer song, so if you play it at an audition, the director may ask you to play a shorter segment or selection.

Showcase your talents through the range of styles and tones. From languidly slow to spunky and fast, this song will show off your versatility.


“Concerto No. 2” (3rd Movement) – F. Seitz

If you’ve been playing for two to three years, try this as an audition piece.

The song has a lot of variety and will allow you to show the director several different skills. It also offers clear-cut sections the director can pick and choose if he or she wants to hear certain excerpts for the audition.


“Concerto in A Minor” (1st Movement) – A. Vivaldi

A familiar, delightful tune, this Antonio Vivaldi concerto is another excellent option, especially for a more advanced audition.

If you’ve been playing for three to four years, master this piece to wow an audition director. It’s a nice advanced-intermediate piece, and on top of that, it’s a fun piece to learn and play!


Famous Violin Solos

“Méditation” (From Thaïs) – Jules Massenet

This is one of the best, most endured violin solos of all time. It’s gorgeous and lush arrangements make it a stunning piece for both personal enjoyment and public performances.

I cannot stress enough how much I recommend adding this to your repertoire as you progress on your musical journey.


“Running Dry” (Requiem for the Rockets) – Neil Young with Crazy Horse (Violinist Bobby Notkoff)

This emotive violin solo is a must-know for rock ‘n’ roll history enthusiasts or anyone interested in pop and rock music from the 1970’s classic rock era.

Performed by violinist Bobby Notkoff, it’s the perfect accompaniment to Neil Young’s melancholy vocal stylings and mid-tempo electric folk balladry.


“The Devil Went Down to Georgia” – The Charlie Daniels Band

When people ask you (and trust me, they will) the difference between a violin and a fiddle, you can tell them with confidence that there’s no difference in the instrument itself; the difference between a violin and a fiddle is in the style or genre of music and some of the techniques.

There are many notable differences between the two main violin genres (classical vs. fiddle) and this song is a great example of that. “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” by famed violinist Charlie Daniels, is probably the single most infamous fiddle piece of all time. And rest assured, as a violinist, people are going to ask you if you know how to play this song.

If you want to go the extra mile and impress these hearty fiddle enthusiasts, it’s a good idea to have this song in your pocket! The fast-fingered fiddle licks are challenging to learn, but they make an exceptional parlor trick to entertain and impress crowds.


“Bittersweet Symphony” – The Verve

The ’90s anthem, “Bittersweet Symphony”, has one of the most memorable violin solos of the era.

This generation-defining song has stood the test of time and the repetitive nature of the song will have you humming the violin part in your head, making it easier to remember and pick up by ear.

This generation-defining song has stood the test of time, and the repetitive nature of the song will have you humming the violin part in your head, which makes it easy to remember and pick up by ear.

Do you have a performance or audition coming up? Check out these tips to pull off a showstopping violin performance!


Classical Violin Solos

“Sonata II” in G Minor – G.F. Händel

This is a stunning piece by one of the most esteemed composers of the Baroque era. The movements take the listener and the performer from somber to upbeat to pastoral, and back to upbeat.

It’s also an excellent example of a Baroque-period piece with plenty of clean lines, phrasing and ornamental trills.


“The Swan” (From The Carnival of the Animals) by C. Saint-Saëns

“The Swan” is one of several pieces that make up a whole known as The Carnival of the Animals. This legendary work of art by Camille Saint-Saëns catalogs some of the common creatures of the zoo, from the swan to the elephant, there’s a piece for each animal.

This elegant and whimsical piece is short, sweet, and always leaves the listener wanting more. Traditionally written for the cello, it translates beautifully to the violin and is full of life and heart.


“The Lark Ascending” by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “The Lark Ascending” is the picture of eloquence. Written during the World War I era following his active duty in France, it stands at an epic 16 minutes.

Inspired by a poem of the same name by George Meredith, it’s an unforgettable piece that takes you on a journey through meadows, woods, and skies.

Now you have several violin solos to choose from! No matter your level, you should be able to find something you can learn to play.

Stuck on a song? Find a violin teacher to help you master your technique! 

Post Author: Naomi Cherie S.
Naomi teaches violin in Austin, TX. She is a classically trained violinist with over 20 years of experience and a diverse musical background. Learn more about Naomi Cherie S. here.

Photo courtesy Tara Kamangar

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