Harper Woods Triumph Middle School

TakeLessons Charter Brings Spanish to Triumph Middle School

TakeLessons Charter brings foreign language and music learning back to independent school and charter school curriculum with live-stream video lesson technology.

Harper Woods Triumph Middle School

TakeLessons Charter Case Study

  • School: Harper Woods Triumph Middle School
  • School Size: 450 Students, Grades 6-8
  • Location: Harper Woods, Michigan
  • Subject: Live Spanish Language Video Lessons

The Harper Woods School District serves Michigan public school students grades K-12 across four campuses, elementary through high school. Triumph Middle School is large by any standards, with an average of 450 students in grades 6-8. The one-to-one school provides every student with a computer and incorporates technology in classroom instruction. Triumph prepares students for high school with core curriculum, and also prioritizes supplemental courses and extracurriculars for a well-rounded experience.

One stand-out school asset is the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (MYT). This middle school program aims to connect the dots between what students are learning in the classroom, and what’s happening in life outside the school grounds. MYT draws connections between core subjects and real world scenarios. MYP celebrates student curiosity and encourages acts of service on campus and beyond.

Triumph further proves its innovative approach to middle school learning by offering foreign language classes.

Triumph further proves its innovative approach to middle school learning by offering foreign language classes. In order to increase Spanish language classes, Triumph partnered with TakeLessons.com to access their network of Spanish language teachers.

Foreign Language in Schools: The Solution

A new partnership with TakeLessons Charter provides Triumph Middle School students with Spanish language classes. The program connects Triumph 6-8 classrooms with top-rated Spanish teachers through two-way livestream video technology. TakeLessons provides the service and vetted teachers, and Triumph administers the programs.

While school districts may lack an abundance of foreign language experts, third party partnerships deliver qualified teachers to their students through creative use of technology.

Felipe R. is the featured Spanish teacher for Triumph. What makes Felipe unique is his life experience residing in Mexico for 17 years. In addition to reading, writing, and speaking skills, Felipe brings a fresh cultural perspective to Spanish instruction. While school districts may lack an abundance of foreign language experts, third party partnerships deliver qualified teachers to their students through creative use of technology.

TakeLessons.com partners with 5,000+ highly-qualified teachers, with specialties in foreign languages, musical instruments, and more unique subjects. TakeLessons Charter serves charter schools and independent schools across the United States.
Challenge Charter School Arizona

TakeLessons Charter Brings Music to Challenge Charter School

TakeLessons Charter brings music and foreign language learning back to independent school and charter school curriculum with live-stream video lesson technology.

Challenge Charter School Arizona

Challenge Charter School is a public charter school in Arizona with 500 students in grades K-6. Under the leadership of Principal Wendy Miller, Challenge Charter provides Core Knowledge curriculum, enriched by computer science and music courses. Learn how a partnership with TakeLessons Charter expanded learning opportunities for students.

TakeLessons Charter Case Study

  • School: Challenge Charter School
  • School Size: 500 Students, Grades K-6, ~24 Students Per Class
  • Location: Glendale, Arizona
  • Subject: Live Video Music Lessons
  • Frequency: 3 Classes Per Day

“Our kids are so excited about the personal relationships they are building with teachers all over the country. They are learning about different accents, weather, geography, and cuisines, while learning music! Kids are innately curious and distance learning allows them to explore so much more.” – Principal Miller

The School: Challenge Charter School

Challenge Charter School is the first Core Knowledge school in Arizona, a designation that represents “engaging, challenging, and content-rich” academic standards. With equal emphasis on differentiation and cross-curricular connections, students benefit from individualized instruction and opportunities to discover deeper meaning. “Challenge” is the name and philosophy, as the goal is to challenge students at their own levels.

Challenge Charter School also leads the way in technology-driven innovation in Arizona. As the first TechSmart Kids school in the state, CCS is committed to integrating computer science coding lessons into the Core Knowledge curriculum. On campus, 11 certified coding instructors teach SkyLark block and Python code, customized for each grade level, beginning as early as Kindergarten. CCS believes that computer science coding learning further supports Core Knowledge lessons in math, problem solving, and logic.

Music in Schools: The Solution

A new partnership with TakeLessons Charter provides CCS students with music classes. The program connects Challenge Charter School K-6 classrooms with top-rated music instructors through two-way livestream video technology.

“There is a teacher shortage in Arizona and many other states in all areas,” explains Principal Miller. “This shortage is even more pervasive in the fine arts, since these positions have been phased out over the past 10 years during budget shortfalls.”

“Our partnership with TakeLessons allows our kids and faculty to enjoy the expertise of three different music instructors, all highly qualified for the content they are teaching, without losing instructional time transitioning classrooms.” – Principal Miller

The TakeLessons partnership solved a staffing challenge for CCS. In the words of Principal Miller: “Our partnership with TakeLessons allows our kids and faculty to enjoy the expertise of three different music instructors, all highly qualified for the content they are teaching, without losing instructional time transitioning classrooms.”

Loretta M. with TakeLessons is the featured teacher for grades 4 and 5 at CCS. Her qualifications include a Master’s of Music degree from New York University and a Bachelor’s of Music degree from University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. Loretta radiates with passion for music education, and boasts over a decade of teaching experience.

“Our 4th and 5th graders are stretching their legs, moving, clapping, and counting their way through rhythms and new melodies.” – Loretta M., Music Teacher

“Each week the students engage in conversations around the sound and feel of music, as well as instrumentation and the surprises they did not expect to hear,” explains Loretta. “Our 4th and 5th graders are stretching their legs, moving, clapping, and counting their way through rhythms and new melodies. Now we are using new memory tools as we move on to creating our very own sheet music.”

Music in Schools: What is the Impact?

The students are thriving in the music classes at CCS, and the impact extends far beyond musical notes. “Several kids who have been shy to open up to their classes in Kindergarten and 1st grade often volunteer for the ‘song of the day’ and sing in front of their classrooms,” shares Principal Miller. “This builds their confidence and comfort greatly. They now volunteer to answer questions in other subjects too.”

“At our community assembly, our 4th graders performed a tune they wrote synchronizing their bodies to demonstrate their knowledge on math, fractions, and angles!” – Principal Miller

Music integration is second nature at CCS, where they strive for kinesthetic learning and action-based classrooms. Music can be a pathway for multi-subject understanding. Principal Miller recounts: “At our community assembly, our 4th graders performed a tune they wrote synchronizing their bodies to demonstrate their knowledge on math, fractions, and angles!” Additionally, music inspires reading in 1st grade: “All early readers, and especially those needing extra support, get great practice following the words while signing. They forget they are practicing because they are having fun!”

Is online learning integration the future of education technology? “I do see this as the direction of the future,” Principal Miller shares. “The quality TakeLessons platform and staff has us on the right path for our students’ preparation and empowerment.”

 

TakeLessons.com partners with 5,000+ highly-qualified teachers, with specialties in foreign languages, musical instruments, and more unique subjects. TakeLessons Charter serves charter schools and independent schools across the United States.
The Role of Technology in the Classroom

The Evolution of Classroom Technology & What’s Coming Next

The Role of Technology in the Classroom

Technology in the classroom is now as common for students as Facebook on the phone. The introduction of classroom technology has diversified teaching methods, increased supplemental course curriculum, simplified administrative tasks, increased student engagement, and changed the education landscape forever.

The tech transition isn’t without its flaws. However, the classroom technology movement is a mirror of our digital world, and the opportunities for online learning are endless.

Current Classroom Technology in Action

The concept of education technology isn’t new; the overhead projector transformed classroom instruction in the 1930s, videotapes brought learning to life in the ‘50s, the Scantron system streamlined grading efficiency in the ‘70s, and computer labs were introduced to campuses in the ‘80s. At the time, this technology was groundbreaking.

Today, advanced classrooms pair students with personal laptop computers, and teachers share lesson plans and assignments through technology tools, including Google Educator. Dusty textbooks and print handouts are replaced by digital textbooks with live hyperlinks and classroom websites with course information updated daily. Interactive apps, such as Socrative, allow students to read text or watch video while pop-up multiple choice questions test comprehension. This gamification approach makes learning fun for students, and provides real time information for teachers.

“Dusty textbooks and print handouts are replaced by digital textbooks with live hyperlinks and classroom websites with course information updated daily.”

The one-to-one computer program means that every student has direct, controlled access to the Internet in class. This technology innovation promotes a collaborative learning environment where students can research and share information. Group projects now connect through shared Google documents, and students can question received knowledge and research topics to confirm or debunk theories. Internet access also opens up a new world of possibilities for what supplemental subjects can be taught through alternative methods. If school budgets limit electives, such as foreign languages, students can connect to qualified teachers through video platforms, like TakeLessons Charter.

New Online Learning Opportunities Through Classroom Technology

Education technology progress doesn’t always align with school budget realities. While computers, Internet access, and software tools create new learning possibilities, qualified teachers will always be the most important piece of the education puzzle.

“How can schools restore arts and humanities electives, while working with limited financial and personnel resources?”

The arts and humanities, though proven to be beneficial for brain development, are historically first to go during budget cuts. Beginning in the late 2000s, more than 80 percent of U.S. school districts experienced a decrease in funding. Many schools sacrificed art, music, and foreign language courses – and teachers – in order to focus on priority math and science subjects. The challenge now is: How can schools restore arts and humanities electives, while working with limited financial and personnel resources?

Technology won’t replace teachers, but innovative classroom technology can connect students with the teachers they need, who specialize in the subjects they want. Charter schools and independent schools without district restrictions can experiment with third party partnerships to enhance their curriculum with supplemental courses. One example is TakeLessons.com, an online learning platform with a network of 5,000 top-rated teachers across the U.S., including professional musicians and foreign language leaders. With their new TakeLessons Charter program, vetted experts can teach music and language lessons to students through interactive, two-way video streaming.

“Technology won’t replace teachers, but innovative classroom technology can connect students with the teachers they need, who specialize in the subjects they want.”

Picture this: The third period bell rings, and as students are seated, a projected video reveals a foreign language teacher who greets the class. This isn’t a one-way YouTube video. Rather, the TakeLessons Charter platform fosters a live classroom dynamic with teacher instruction, student questions, and community interaction from start to finish. The session is administered by a school professional in the classroom.

TakeLessons Charter is an example of the new wave of classroom technology. Available curriculum spans music classes in piano, guitar, ukelele, and vocal singing, as well as foreign language classes in Spanish, Sign Language, French, and English.

In the 21st century digital age, classroom technology innovation is exciting and inevitable. It’s a reflection of the world we live in, and the world we’re preparing our students for. From teacher-run websites and app-based lesson plans, to video-enabled instruction with experts, new technology in the classroom expands learning potential for all students.

 

Explore new online learning opportunities in language, music, and more.

TakeLessons Charter Brings ASL to Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy

TakeLessons Charter Brings ASL to Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy

TakeLessons Charter brings foreign language, music, and more supplemental learning back to independent school and charter school curriculum with live-stream video lesson technology.

TakeLessons Charter Brings ASL to Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy

Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy is redefining technology-driven, individualized education for the Jewish community of Stamford, Connecticut. Upper School students now experience American Sign Language lessons through a live-stream video platform – proving that staffing restrictions don’t have to limit learning possibilities.

TakeLessons Charter Case Study

  • School: Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy Upper School
  • School Size: 53 High School Students | 6-10 Students Per Classroom
  • Location: Stamford, Connecticut
  • Subject: American Sign Language Live Video Lessons
“It was difficult to find an ASL teacher to teach in-person, and with TakeLessons, we are able to offer the class for our students.” – Sarah Rich, BCHA

The School: Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy

Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy is a small school with big academic impact framed by Jewish values. Following a merger of Bi-Cultural Day School and Jewish High School of Connecticut, the all-in-one Academy now welcomes pre-K through grade 12 students. Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy (BCHA) is the only school of its kind in the state, and is showcasing its innovative practices through a partnership with TakeLessons Charter – an online learning platform with real teachers and real lessons, streaming live.

BCHA’s Upper School offers high school students both STEM and Judaic studies, including an advanced CIJE-Tech High School Engineering Program that introduces scientific and biomedical engineering. The foreign language of focus is Hebrew, and with the TakeLessons partnership, American Sign Language (ASL) is now part of the curriculum.

Foreign Language in Schools: The Solution

Foreign language learning has long been regarded as an essential component of a well-rounded education. In recent decades, however, both budget restraints and geography restrictions have stood in the way of schools fulfilling their language course requirements.

For Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy Upper School, staff desired to add a second language option for students who may struggle with Hebrew class. “It was difficult to find an ASL teacher in our region,” explains Sarah Rich with BCHA. Rather than sacrificing the American Sign Language program, they embraced technology to deliver instruction through live-stream video. Rich continues: “With TakeLessons, we are able to offer the ASL class. We hope that our students will be able to communicate via sign language.”

“Studying ASL has given our students a boost of confidence that they did not feel when studying other languages.” – Sarah Rich, BCHA

TakeLessons provides the technology service and the qualified teacher: Vanessa L., a credentialed Sign Language Interpreter who earned her degree at South Texas College. Vanessa is a trilingual professional, fluent in English, Spanish, and ASL, with deep knowledge of sign language and deaf culture. By removing the physical, in-classroom requirement, BCHA met the ASL teacher they were searching for. “The students are enjoying the class and they really like Vanessa,” says Rich. “Studying ASL has given our students a boost of confidence that they did not feel when studying other languages.”

TakeLessons Charter in Schools: How it Works

TakeLessons built a two-way technology platform, TakeLessons Classroom, that allows vetted experts to teach lessons through video projection, while answering questions and providing feedback. In the physical classroom, students interact with each other and the teacher, breaking down the barrier of separation through live-stream connection.

TakeLessons Classroom allows vetted experts to teach lessons through video projection, while answering questions and providing feedback.

At Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy, one Upper School class is learning American Sign Language with TakeLessons Classroom. BCHA provides the computer, internet, and minimal IT setup, with technical support from TakeLessons every step of the way. “We didn’t have any challenges implementing the program,” shares Rich. As the bell rings, students sit down and learn sign language through live, two-dimensional video.

The TakeLessons partnership enables BCHA to live their values by utilizing technology, offering additional language learning opportunities, and customizing courses to fit student needs. Rich adds: “Speaking another language is a great skill, and it works different parts of the brain that other subjects may not tap into.” As for the future of online learning integration into traditional classrooms, Rich is a believer: “I think schools will be able to offer more options for classes.”

 

TakeLessons.com partners with 5,000+ highly-qualified teachers, with specialties in foreign languages, musical instruments, and more unique subjects. TakeLessons Charter serves charter schools and independent schools across the United States.