thanksgiving songs for kids

10 Thanksgiving Piano Songs Kids Will Gobble Up

thanksgiving songs for kids

Are you looking for some Thanksgiving songs for kids? Below, piano teacher Alicia B. shares 10 yummy turkey tunes kids will love playing…

Whether it’s playing for friends and family around the table or at a school holiday party, Thanksgiving is an excellent time for beginner piano players to demonstrate their skills to a welcoming crowd.

Below are 10 Thanksgiving songs for kids. These piano songs vary by level and style, so there’s something for everyone.

1. Five Fat Turkeys Are We: Primer level

Veteran piano teacher and university professor, Gilbert De Benedetti compiles several arranged and original holiday-themed songs, including this primer-level piece, “Five Fat Turkeys Are We.”

It’s a great Thanksgiving song for kids, as it has kid-humor lyrics. For example, “Five fat turkeys are we, we slept all night in a tree, when the cook came round, we couldn’t be found, so that’s why we’re here you see!”

Find this and other free music at

2. Hurray, Thanksgiving Day!: Pre-reading level

Educator, Susan Paradis wrote this Thanksgiving song for kids as part of her teaching resources blog, which focuses on the pre-reading level.

It’s a great easy piano piece your beginners can learn in a day. The song even has lyrics for the cousin choir. Find this free piano piece on

3. Simple Gifts: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Originally a Shaker hymn (other interpretations include it as a dance song), “Simple Gifts,” is an American folk tune written by Joseph Brackett.

The piano song’s tone of wistful Americana makes it ideal for this time of year.

Many classical fans have heard the song as part of Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring,” and today it’s used for several movies and television holiday specials.

4. Turkey in the Straw: Beginner, Intermediate

The American folk song, “Turkey in the Straw” dates back to the early 1800s and is comprised of themes from other countries, such as Ireland.

Given its steady eighth-note feel, it was originally popularized as a fiddle tune, but is now enjoyed by all instrumentations.

Find a version of “Turkey in the Straw” for piano players on

5. We Gather Together: Intermediate, Beginner

This hymn was originally taken from a Dutch folk tune. Composer, Adrianus Valerius added lyrics to commemorate the victory over the Spanish in the Battle of Turnhout.

In current day, the piano song is often heard around the Thanksgiving holiday, as its title and lyrics suggest a time to join and reflect on the year’s blessings.

The 3/4 time signature and dotted quarter note pattern is a great warm up for “Silent Night,” which shares a similar structure.

You can find Andrew Fling’s arrangement of this tune on

6. Thanksgiving Theme (A Charlie Brown Christmas): Advanced, Intermediate

Pianist and composer, Vince Guaraldi made an indelible mark on American culture when he composed a series of jazz-inspired pieces to accompany Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and the gang for the 1965 television special, “A Charlie Brown Christmas.”

Since that time, the laid-back jazzy tunes have become a staple of the holiday season, and “Thanksgiving Theme” is a wonderful example.

Its driving 3/4 time signature and cascading triplets beautifully juxtapose the busyness of the season and the beauty of falling snow.

This piece is available for purchase in many Charlie Brown songbook collections.

7. Teacher’s Pet  (School of Rock, The Musical): Intermediate

Now coming to Broadway, School of Rock (originally a 2005 movie starring Jack Black) inspired a generation of kids to get involved in music education through high-energy classic rock and soul music.

The upcoming Broadway cast is performing at the 2015 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, which should inspire and invigorate your young pianists, as the cast is comprised of actual child musicians – and even features a rockin’ keyboard solo!

8. Autumn Leaves: Intermediate, Advanced

Well-known jazz standard, “Autumn Leaves” began as the 1945 French song, “Les feuilles mortes” (The Dead Leaves) by Joseph Kosma.

It was only after American songwriter Johnny Mercer added English lyrics in 1947, did it gain popularity as a pop and jazz standard.

It’s now often used as a teaching tool for beginner jazz pianists, as it illustrates a ii-V-i (2-5-1) chord progression pattern, a pivotal concept in many jazz standards and improvisation.

9. Largo and Scherzo from Dvorak’s New World Symphony: Intermediate, Beginner

Highly celebrated Bohemian (now Czech Republic) composer, Antonin Dvorak had always been influenced by his geographic surroundings.

It is of no surprise, therefore, that when he moved to the U.S. in 1892 he wrote his impressions in his 9th symphony, commonly known as the “New World” Symphony.

The Largo movement is a solemn march that takes direct influence from African American spirituals and Native American intervals and rhythms in the Scherzo.

Find a version of the Largo movement on

10. Mashed Potatoes U.S.A.: Beginner, Intermediate

This early James Brown classic is basically a rhythm and blues jam in which Brown lists every one of his favorite cities.

The song’s driving groove is perfect for the cooking mood and it’s a great way to practice some blues improvisation. Encourage your guests to chime in with the city in which they’re visiting, while giving shout-outs to their favorite side dish.

You can find a recording of this song, and many blues backing tracks to practice with on YouTube.

These Thanksgiving piano songs for kids will keep your pumpkin pi(e)anists practicing until Black Friday! Happy Thanksgiving and have a musically merry holiday season!

Untitled design 66Post Author: Alicia B.
Alicia B. teaches piano, violin, music performance, and more. She is a graduate of Miami’s Public Arts Programs, including Coral Reef Senior High and the Greater Miami Youth Symphony. Alicia has over 15+ years of musical experience. Learn more about Alicia here!

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piano pop songs

100 Piano Pop Songs Everyone Will Love

piano pop songs

Do you need a break from classical music? Below, piano teacher Liz T. shares 100 piano pop songs you can add to your repertoire…

Are you sick of playing the same classical tunes over and over again? It may be time to spice up your piano playing by adding a few piano pop songs to the mix.

Whether you’re into pop rock or R&B, there are tons of popular pop songs you can learn on the piano.

Not only will learning piano pop songs help keep you interested, but it will also improve your performances.

Its common for piano players to get requests for pop songs. Learning a few piano pop songs will ensure that you’re ready to go at a moment’s notice.

Below is a list of 100 piano pop songs that everyone will enjoy. The following songs are broken down into various categories for easy browsing.

Choose a few of your favorite songs to add to your repertoire. Please note that some of these piano pop songs are more difficult than others.

If you can’t play one, just move onto an easier one until you’ve sharped your skills.

Easy Piano Pop Songs for Kids

  • Don’t Worry, Be Happy: Bob Marley
  • Go the Distance: Hercules
  • Mmm Bop: Hanson
  • Let it Go:Frozen
  • Happy: Pharrell Williams
  • You’ll be in My Heart: Tarzan
  • Accidentally in Love: Sherk
  • Ain’t No Mountain High Enough: Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell
  • A Whole New World: Aladdin
  • Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen
  • I See the Light: Tangled
  • Somewhere Over the Rainbow: Judy Garland
  • The Rainbow Connection: Kermit the Frog
  • My Girl: Temptations
  • Circle of Life: The Lion King
  • I Got You Babe: Sonny and Cher
  • Kiss The Girl: The Little Mermaid
  • Do You Want to Build A Snowman?: Frozen
  • Wouldn’t It Be Nice: The Beach Boys
  • Reflection: Mulan
  • That’s How You Know: Enchanted
  • YMCA: Village People
  • Part of Your World: The Little Mermaid
  • The Medallion Calls: Pirates of the Caribbean

Best Piano Pop Songs for Teens

  • Get Lucky: Daft Punk
  • Sexy and I Know It: LMFAO
  • Thrift Shop: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis
  • Clarity: Zedd
  • Born This Way:Lady Gaga
  • Thinking Out Loud: Ed Sheeran
  • Before He Cheats:Carrie Underwood
  • Boyfriend: Justin Beiber
  • Single Ladies: Beyonce
  • Party in the U.S.A: Miley Cyrus
  • California Girls: Katie Perry
  • Trouble: Taylor Swift
  • I Want It That Way:Backstreet Boys
  • Bye, Bye, Bye: NSYNC
  • Waterfalls: TLC
  • Wannabe: Spice Girls
  • Hit Me Baby One More Time: Britney Spears
  • Ain’t No Other Man: Christina Aguilera
  • Lady Marmalade: Moulin Rouge
  • I Believe I Can Fly: R. Kelly
  • Rehab: Amy Winehouse
  • Uptown Funk: Bruno Mars
  • Rolling in the Deep: Adele
  • Hey Ya: Outkast
  • Torn: Natalie Imbruglia
  • Wonderwall: Oasis
  • Hero: Mariah Carey
  • Respect: Aretha Franklin
  • Shake It Off: Taylor Swift

Piano Pop Songs for Adults

  • The Piano Man: Billy Joel
  • Bennie and the Jets: Elton John
  • Dancing Queen: Abba
  • Hey Jude:The Beatles
  • California Dreaming: The Mamma’s and The Papa’s
  • Roxanne: Sting
  • Superstitious: Stevie Wonder
  • River Deep, Mountain High: Tina Turner
  • Natural Woman: Carole King
  • Can’t Help Falling in Love: Elvis
  • American Pie: Don McLean
  • I Can’t Make You Love Me: Bonnie Raitt
  • What a Wonderful World: Ray Charles
  • Do You Think I’m Sexy: Rod Stewart
  • Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For: U2
  • Hotel California: The Eagles
  • Crazy:Willie Nelson and Patsy Cline
  • I Will Always Love You: Dolly Parton
  • Moondance: Van Morrison
  • Knockin on Heaven’s Door: Bob Dylan
  • Bridge Over Troubled Water: Simon and Garfunkel
  • Last Dance: Donna Summers
  • Stairway to Heaven: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant
  • Big Yellow Taxi: Joni Mitchell
  • Born in the U.S.A: Bruce Springsteen
  • My Heart will Go On: Celine Dion
  • Material Girl: Madonna
  • Time After Time: Cyndi Lauper
  • Stop! In the Name of Love: Diana Ross
  • Lanslide: Fleetwood Mac
  • Wind Beneath My Wings: Bette Midler
  • Don’t rain on my Parade: Barbra Streisand
  • Don’t Stop Believing: Journey
  • Sweet Caroline: Neil Diamond
  • Smooth Criminal: Michael Jackson
  • I’ve Had the Time of My Life: Dirty Dancing
  • I’ll Make Love to You: Boyz II men
  • Un-Break My Heart:Toni Braxton
  • Killing Me Softly: Roberta Flack
  • Ironic: Alanis Morrisette
  • Kiss From a Rose: Seal
  • Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Pat Benetar
  • I Can’t Get No Satisfaction: The Rolling Stones
  • At Last: Etta James
  • Sweet Child of Mine: Guns and Roses
  • Sweet Home Alabama: Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • Livin on a Prayer: Bon Jovi

Where to Find Piano Pop Sheet Music

Now that you’ve browsed through the 100 piano pop songs, chances are you’re going to need some piano sheet music. Below are some great websites where you can find sheet music for all of the piano pop songs above.

  • Piano Play It: From pop to Disney, this website has great piano sheet music for kids and beginners. The best part is it’s free! Check out the website here.
  • This website has a ton of piano sheet music. You can browse through categories, such as “playalong jam tracks,” “most popular piano,” and more. Check out the website here.
  • OnlinePianist: This website also has a wide variety of piano pop sheet music. What’s great about this website is that it indicates whether a song is beginner, intermediate, and advanced. Check out the website here.

Expand your repertoire with these fun piano pop songs. If you need help learning new techniques and styles, ask your piano teacher for some help!

Photos by woodleywonderworks and Jeff Dun

LizTPost Author: Liz T.
Liz T. teaches singing, acting, and music lessons online. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

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piano practice

50 Best Pinterest Accounts for Inspiring Piano Practice Ideas


piano practice

Are you in a piano practice rut lately? There’s nothing worse than having to practice or teach the same piano songs and techniques over and over again. It’s enough to drive someone mad!

Luckily, there are many resources available online that can help spark inspiration. Pinterest, for example, is a great resource for both students and  piano teachers. There are hundreds of pages dedicated solely to piano playing.

Since we know you don’t have time to sift through all of these pages, we’ve rounded up the 50 best Pinterest accounts for piano practice ideas, games, sheet music, and more.

Whether you’re a student or a teacher, these Pinterest pages are great for finding ideas to spice up your piano practice routine. So without further ado, let’s get started.

Piano Practice Tips


1. Hannah-Lee Ableson: “Teaching Piano” has a ton of piano practice tips both parents and teachers can easily implement. We particular love all the tips for parents, such as how to end piano practice wars and how to deal with never-ending excuses. Check it out here.

2. Chrissy Krahn: “Piano-Tips for Teachers” has a variety of how-to’s that are primarily geared toward teachers. However, there are some tips and exercises that parents can use to encourage their children to practice. Check it out here.

3. Laura Lowe: “Piano Studio” is another great board that boasts an array of piano practice tips students can use to improve. Everything from hand positioning to common music mistakes is featured on the board. Check it out here.

4. Beverly Cox: If you’re looking for a wide variety of piano practice tips, look no further than “Piano Stuff.” This board has kid-friendly tips about how to read notes, play scales, sight read, and more. Check it out here. 

5. Christy Young: From sight reading to proper posture, “Piano Practice Techniques” covers everything beginner piano players need to get started. It also has some great tips for teachers who are might be struggling to think of practice exercises. Check it out here.

6. Leila Viss: “Keys to Piano” features a ton of quality information for piano players, teachers, and parents. We particularly like all of the ideas for keeping kids motivated to practice. Check it out here.

7. Melody Payne: “Piano Teacher Articles” isn’t just great for teachers, but it’s also helpful for students and parents. The board has an array of information on how to make the most of one’s practice time. Check it out here.

8. Ashley Caldwell Brown: “Piano” features a variety of practical piano tips that will help kids stay motivated. We particularly like all of the advice for parents who want to help their child practice. Check it out here.

9. Gail Fischler: With four boards related to piano, Fischler has a wide scope of information related to piano. Browse through her “Piano Addict Tips & Resources” board to discover helpful tips you can apply to your next practice. Check it out here.

10. Emily Zook: Looking for some actionable practice tips? “Piano” has a bunch of helpful tips and activities that will help students improve their piano skills. Check it out here.

11. Carri Corbitt: From practice tips to sheet music, “Tickle Those Ivories Piano Studio” has over 200 useful pins for both piano students and teachers. We especially like all of the fun, free printables. Check it out here.

12. Rhonda Hunter: If you’re looking for piano sheet music, “Education/Piano Music” is the right board for you. This board has fun practice tips and sheet music every student will love. Check it out here.

13. Nichole Lookabaugh: Warming up is an important part of piano practice. “Piano Lessons” has some fun warm-up exercises as well as some technique tips to help assist students. Check it out here.

Piano Practice Games


14. Susan Paradis: From rhythm bingo to memory match, “Music Games and Worksheets” has everything parents and teachers need to keep their budding musician entertained. Check it out here.

15. The Plucky Pianista: “The Plucky Pianista” has over 100 useful pins for students and teachers, including a ton of fun and educational games. We especially like the warm up games for building strength and dexterity. Check it out here.

16. Claire Westlake: “Music Education” is a wonderful board that features an array of engaging games and activities for students, many of which are easy and cost effective to replicate. Check it out here.

17. Andrea Dow: “Teach Piano Today” has over 27 boards full of inspiration geared toward piano teachers. We particularly love her piano teaching games board, which features dozens of fun and education piano practice games for students. Check it out here.

18. Wendy Stevens: With 17 boards dedicated to piano, Wendy Stevens has everything a piano teacher or parent is looking for. Browse through her “Piano Teaching Games” board for piano games to inspire your next practice session. Check it out here.

19. Joy Morin: “Color in My Piano” features a great roundup of piano practice games for students. Even better, the board has a number of printable PDFs that you can download and use during your next piano practice. Check it out here.

20. Carla Lowery: With over 6,000 pins, “Music Stuff” has an abundance of tips, activities, and resources for both students and teachers. We love all of the different games that come with printables. Check it out here.

21. Chantelle Thaler: With over 467 pins related to piano, “Piano Studio-Inspiration, Games, Printables,” has everything a budding piano player needs, including a number of unique and education piano practice games. Check it out here.

22. Kathy Williamson: If you’re looking to engage your child or student, “Teaching Piano” is a great resource. The board has a number of piano practice games that are simple for parents and teachers to play with their budding musician. Check it out here.

23. Micheline Roch: Learning the piano doesn’t have to be boring. “Piano Studio” has an abundance of fun piano games that students can play, many of which use simple household items. Check it out here.

24. Julie Williams: “Piano Lessons Teaching Aids” is another board that features tons of fun, and engaging piano games for beginner piano players. We particular like all of the free printouts she provides. Check it out here.

25. Alicia Dunlap: “My Keys” is a great resource filled with piano games geared toward young, beginner students. From sound match games to finger patterns, this board has a variety of fun games. Check it out here.

26. Lana Hughes: Learning complex musical concepts can be difficult for beginners.”Piano Teaching” features a number of fun games that make these concepts easy for students to understand. Check it out here.

27. Katrina Grabham: “Piano Teaching” has a ton of kid-friendly piano games for students who have a hard time sitting still on the bench. Check it out here.

Piano Practice Sheets

piano practice

28. Kacie Zajic: “Teaching Piano” is a great resource for young musicians, as the board features several themed piano practice sheets. For example, she has some fun holiday-themed piano practice sheets for kids. Check it out here.

29. Patti Kolk: “Piano Teaching Ideas” has a wide variety of piano practice sheets for beginners as well as general music exercises to help little ones understand how to read scales and rhythms. Check it out here.

30. Debbie Lumpkin:“Music Board” is a great general music board for youngsters. The board features an array of practice sheets to help students learn rhythms, notes, and more. Check it out here.

31. Music Teacher Resources: With over 69 boards, “Music Teacher Resources” has everything from free, printable piano practice sheets to music theory assignments. We especially love how the boards are organized by age-group. Check it out here.

32. Shirley Cadle: “Love Teaching the Piano” is a wonderful board with everything from helpful time signature worksheets to metronome tips. Check it out here.

33. Bethany Parnell: Running out of ideas for practice time? “Piano Studio” has a number of helpful piano practice sheets as well as tips for keeping kids engaged during practice. Check it out here.

34. Marilyn Herrett: Whether you’re looking to work on sight reading or rhythm, “For My Piano Studio” has everything you need. We particularly love all of the holiday-themed worksheets. Check it out here.

35. Anjuli Crocker: If you’re looking for piano sheet music and practice sheets then look no further than “Kids Piano.” This board is filled with helpful tips and exercises. Check it out here.

36. Jenny Boster: “Piano Teaching” is filled with sample exercises and practice sheets students can use  to practice various piano skills, such as chord inversions and note naming. Check it out here.

37. Mary Miller: With over 1,000 pins, “School Stuff” has everything you need to keep your child engaged and learning during their piano practice sessions. Check it out here.

38. Inge Borg: While this board is primarily geared toward teachers, it has a ton of great practice sheets and tips for students. We especially love the wide variety. Check it out here.

Piano Practice Charts

39. Diane Hidy: With over 10 boards dedicated to piano, Diana Hidy has an array of practice charts, inspiration, tools, and ideas for students, teachers, and parents. We especially love all the helpful tips for teachers. Check it out here.

40. Barnes Piano LLC: Are you looking for some piano practice charts? “Piano Teaching Games” has an array of sample sheets and tips for how to structure your child’s piano practice. The board also includes some fun, educational games. Check it out here.

41. Sara @ Let’s Play Music:“First Piano Lessons for Kids” is great for beginner piano players, as the site has a wide variety of exercises, games, and charts. We particular like how many of the piano practice charts can be download for convenience. Check it out here.

42. Heather Nanney: “Piano Lesson: Practicing” has a ton of free piano practice charts and worksheets both teachers and parents can use to keep track of their child’s progress. The board also features several resources on how to make practice fun. Check it out here.

43. Tim Topham: “Piano Practice” has an abundance of resources and tips for practicing piano. We suggest taking a look at the practice charts for kids. Tim also has a number of other helpful piano boards you can browse. Check it out here.

44. Tracy King: The self-proclaimed “Bulletin Board Lady,” Tracy King has ton of music practice charts that can be applied to several instruments, including the piano. Check it out here.

 45. Kelly Nelson: Besides having an abundance of tips for teachers, “Piano Students” has a wide variety useful piano practice charts that are super helpful for students. Check it out here.

46. Shana Elliot: “Music Class Printables” has an array of practice charts and worksheets that are great for kids. We especially love all of the holiday-themed charts for Halloween, Christmas, and more. Check it out here.

47. Larissa Coleman: If you’re looking for piano practice charts and beginner piano sheet music, than look no further “Piano Lessons.” The board has a ton of great resources for beginner students. Check it out here.

48. Patty Johnson: “Piano Lesson Ideas” is filled with a ton of piano practice charts. Whether you want to work on rhythm or melody, this board has everything you’re looking for. Check it out here.

49. Kim Smith: With over 1,000 pins, “Music Classroom/Piano Lessons” has an abundance of entertaining practice sheets and tips. We particularly like the fun worksheets! Check it out here.

50. Tiffiny Almond Allen: Head over to “Piano Teaching” and browse through all of the fun worksheets and practice charts. You’re sure to find something that will keep your little one engaged while practicing. Check it out here.

51. LadyD Piano: LadyD Piano has a variety of boards for those learning how to play piano. For example, she has a board dedicated to music apps, books, and practice printables. Check it out here.

52. Ashely Danyew: “Piano Teaching” has an abundance of wonderful tips and tricks for both piano players and students. We especially love all the resources that help teachers motivate students. Check it out here.

If you’re bored with your piano practice routine or you simply want to mix things up, browse through these Pinterest accounts to get some inspiration. Remember, practice makes perfect!

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piano jokes

50 of the Best Piano Jokes, Quotes, and Puns

piano jokes

Pianos have been a musical staple for centuries. The piano inspires more than just musical sounds; it also makes for a great punch line.

Below are 50 of the best piano jokes, puns, and quotes of all time. Share this list with fellow pianists or your piano teacher.

While we admit some of these piano jokes are a little “out there,” they’re sure to put a smile on your face.

Let the laughs begin…

Best Piano Jokes

Everybody loves a good piano joke! Next time you meet with your piano teacher, start by telling him or her one of these clever piano jokes and see if he or she can’t guess the right answer.

Have you heard about the musician who leaves a message for his wife? Answer: Gone Chopin, have Liszt, Bach in a Minuet.

Why are pianists fingers like lightning? Answer: They rarely strike the same place twice.

The audience at a piano recital was appalled when a telephone rang just off stage. Without missing a note, the soloist glanced toward the wings and called, “If that’s my agent, tell him I’m working!”

What do you call a goat that plays the piano? Answer: Billy Joel.

B flat, E flat, and G flat walk into a bar. The bartender stopped them and said, “We don’t serve minors.”

piano jokes

What do you call a snowman that plays the piano? Answer: Melton John

piano joke

What’s one of the hazards of being a pianist? Answer: People drop money in your drink.

piano jokes

What happens when you play Beethoven backwards? Answer: He decomposes.

piano jokes

What do you get if you enroll in a liberal arts program and the only subject you do well in is music? Answer: A natural major

Funniest Piano Puns

There are a ton of piano puns to go around. Below are a few of our favorite piano puns. Share these with your musical friends and have a laugh.

What do you get when you drop a piano down a mine shaft? Answer: A-flat minor.

Why is an 11-foot concert grand better than a studio upright? Answer: Because it makes a much bigger boom when pushed off a cliff.

Why did the two pianists have a good marriage. Answer: Because they were always in a chord.

Old pianists never die, they just adagio away.

To climb to the top of a tall piano, you must scale it.

Piano is not my forte.

Don’t date a piano technician, he’ll just string you along

Gimme’ a fifth of Beethoven on the Rachs.

Inspirational Piano Quotes

Need some inspiration to get you through a tough performance or practice session? Below are some inspirational (and humorous) piano quotes that will help keep you motivated.

“Piano: A cumbersome piece of furniture found in many homes, where playing it ensures the early departure of unwanted guests.” – David W. Barber

“The piano ain’t got no wrong notes.” – Thelonious Monk

“Everybody told me this ‘girl on the piano’ thing was never going to work.” – Tori Amos

“The piano has been drinking, not me”. – Tom Waits

“When she started to play, Steinway came down personally and rubbed his name off the piano.” – Bob Hope talking about Phyllis Diller’s playing

piano jokes

“Life is like a piano. White keys are happy moments and black keys are sad moments. But remember, both keys are played together to give sweet music.” -Unknown

piano jokes

“To send light into the darkness of men’s hearts-such is the duty of the artist.”- Robert Schumann

piano jokes

“To play a wrong note is insignificant; to play without passion is inexcusable.”- Beethoven

piano jokes

While difficult at times, learning how to play the piano should be fun. Lighten up the mood with one of these hilarious piano jokes, puns, or quotes.

Did we leave out any of your favorite piano jokes, pun, or quotes? Share them with us in the comments below!

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Kids’ Piano Lessons: How Often Should My Child Practice?


Wondering how to best provide support and encouragement for your kids’ piano lessons, particularly when it comes to practicing? Here’s some great advice from Augustine, FL piano teacher Heather L...


When it comes to kids’ piano lessons, how often should a student be practicing? This is a common question that I’ve often received over the years. Parents find the best instructors for their children, invest time and resources in their music education, but aren’t sure quite what to do when the kids are at home, ready to practice. Frankly, this issue might turn into a tense conversation sometimes. Teachers will remind parents of their share of the responsibility for encouraging their child’s studies; parents have high expectations of how influential the teachers will be on how diligently the students study at home. Teachers might remind parents that they can’t very well go home with the student, but on the other hand, they’re failing to help educate the parents on how exactly to be a part of the educational journey.

As a parent of a young pianist, you could be the very element in their music education that projects them to success – self-confidence, the ability to think critically, and a lifelong love of learning. If you were to study the great pianists, or even simply the best-educated, hardest-working people in the world, then you would probably find a parent who was consistently inspiring.

All of this brings us to the question, “How often should my child practice?” It is part of my teaching philosophy that every piano lesson, and more importantly, every student, is different. One job of the teacher is to identify, over time, a student’s particular learning style and general attitudes about work, and then adjust the specific practice schedule accordingly.

All students should practice six days a week. How long each daily session is, depends on the child’s age. Typically speaking, young children, ages 3 and 4, should be practicing about 10 minutes. Five- and six-year-olds should extend it to 15 minutes, seven- and eight-year-olds, 20 minutes, nine- and ten-year-olds, 25 minutes. Children ages 11 through 14 should devote a full half of an hour to their piano studies.

The time suggestions listed above are merely that. They are also subject to change due to an upcoming audition or performance. In the case in which your child has, for instance, a recital coming up, the daily practice session should be extended by 10 minutes. Practice time suggestions should also change according to long-term goals. If you have a 15-year-old teenager who wishes to audition for the Juilliard School, then his practice habits will be different from the 10-year-old soccer player who plays piano for fun and just wants a lifelong hobby.

Ultimately, the most important thing to remember is that your young pianist’s hands should be on the keys six days every week. If a child is really tired of his regular piano curriculum, then it’s still important to play something, even if it’s just for fun. Encourage your child to pull out an old piece that they’ve always loved to play. If your child dreads the length of each practice session, “I’m TIRED of practicing!”, then let him take a short break and come back to piano later. It’s important not to force a child into a frustrated and resentful state, or else they might always hate playing the piano. Inspire a healthy relationship with the his keyboard studies, and you’ll see a great pianist blossom.

HeatherLHeather L. teaches singing, piano, acting, and more in Saint Augustine, FL, as well as through online lessons. She is a graduate of the prestigious Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey, and has performed with the New York and Royal Philharmonics, the New Jersey and Virginia Symphonies, the American Boy Choir, and the internationally renowned opera star Andrea Bocelli. Learn more about Heather here!


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Top Five Piano Songs For Kids

2372172953_8da7d61e8e_bAre you a teacher or a parent looking for some great piano songs for kids? Check out these suggestions from Nutley, NJ teacher Christina C

As a piano teacher at several music schools in northern NJ, I’ve attended quite a few recitals. While listening to my colleagues’ students as well as my own, I’ve heard a variety of musical pieces performed, which got me thinking: What are the top five piano songs for kids to play?

Since there are many different songs and arrangements of songs to suit different levels of ability, I will stick to the top five songs that can be learned within the first year or two of taking piano lessons. The following five pieces are in order of easiest to most difficult, but assumes that other songs will be taught in between learning them.

Mary Had a Little Lamb

The first song I teach my students, after introducing them to the white keys of the piano in “C position” is “Mary Had a Little Lamb”. This song is easy, recognizable, and children can play its simple melody with their right hand alone. Kids love to play this because they are excited about playing a song that they already know, and can show to their family and friends, who will recognize it too.

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

Another song I have a lot of success with is “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”. This song is great because the melody can be taught first using all five fingers of the right hand, and teaching the new concept of stretching your pinky finger over to the right to play the A key as well as the G key. This is a perfect piece to teach this new concept because the student can easily see that the hand should stay mainly in the C position, only moving the pinky to the right as necessary to play the A.

Another good thing about this song is that after the right hand melody part is taught, I help the student learn the underlying chords that go with the melody to play with their left hand. I explain how to find the “home note” and how to identify the key that the song is in by listening. Three very basic major chords are used (C, F, and G) and they happen to also be the I, IV, and V chords, respectively, which is also a very important concept to learn, as many songs use this very popular chord progression. After learning the melody and chords with each hand playing separately, when the student is ready, we put the hands together.

Happy Birthday

My third pick for top piano songs for kids to learn would have to be “Happy Birthday.” This is a staple song in a pianist’s repertoire. The next time your child attends a birthday party for a family member or friend, encourage them to play the song on the piano while everyone else sings along! This is also a good song to teach kids because the melody can be split between both hands for an early beginner to learn, or arranged for the melody to be played with the right hand and the chords with the left for a more advanced student.

The next two pieces I have selected are classical and also more difficult, but can usually be incorporated into a student’s repertoire within the first year or two of study.

Minuet in G (J.S. Bach)

There are two sections to this Minuet and most people will instantly recognize the first section. I usually play the whole piece for my student, and get them the music for both sections – but so they don’t feel overwhelmed, I tell them that we are only going to learn the first part and see how it goes. I slowly teach them the beginning of the first section- right hand separately, then left hand separately. They will practice it hands separately for a week in between lessons and then start putting the hands together. Before they know it, they are playing Bach and they are usually so excited they can’t wait to go on to the next section of the piece!

Fur Elise

Finally, this list would not be complete without “Fur Elise” by Ludwig van Beethoven. I can remember hearing it as a little girl and wanting to play it as soon as possible, which I did! It is fairly easy to play, and uses both major and minor chords. There are different arrangements with simpler left hand chords that also skip the middle sections of the piece, which are rather challenging to a beginner. These easier arrangements are really wonderful because they allow a beginner to play a well-known classical piece, which can really boost their student’s confidence.

These five pieces are highly recommended to learn if you are taking piano lessons. Each song has its own concepts to learn in addition to learning to play the song itself. If you are in your first year or two of piano lessons, see which of these you have played and which you have yet to learn. Ask your piano teacher about anything on this list that you have not yet learned, and I’m sure that he or she will be able to take it from there and teach you arrangements of these songs appropriate to your individual level. Above all, enjoy playing the piano!

ChristinaCChristina C. teaches piano, composition, songwriting, and more in Nutley, NJ. She majored in Piano Performance at Ithaca College, and has over 15 years of teaching experience in professional music studios in NJ. Learn more about Christina here! 

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Learning Piano: Keeping Young Students Excited About Music


Is your child learning piano this summer? Check out these tips from Des Moines, IA teacher Mariana P. to help him or her stay on track and motivated…

Do you have a young child who just started taking piano lessons? The summer is a great time to start lessons, since children have more time and are able to practice a little more, which is essential to grasp the basics of music and piano technique. However, with more time also come fun vacations and camps.

So, how do you help your new piano player retain what he or she has just learned when you’re away? First of all, speak to your instructor and get their insight. The lesson before a trip or summer camp, meet for five to ten minutes at the end to discuss a plan. If you feel confident enough to guide your child through a few new pieces, exercises, or worksheets, have your instructor write down a detailed plan of what to do in between lessons.

For example:
Week 1 – Lesson book page X, theory book page X, technique book page X
Week 2 – Lesson book page Y, theory book page Y, technique book page Y

Please be aware that almost every lesson book page has a corresponding theory, technique, and performance page and you will be able to find those at the bottom of either the lesson book pages or the complementary book’s pages.

Supplementary Materials

If your child has a particular weak point, go ahead and explore some of the worksheets available for download or purchase at lesson plan marketplaces like Teachers Pay Teachers or Lesson Plan Pro.

I have a four year-old student who is just learning her finger numbers, so I suggested to her mom to visit The Plucky Pianista and download her Froggy Fingers worksheet. I’ve used it with my most recent students who are new to learning piano and have had a ton of success. If your child is more into games, Susan Paradis has a couple of them for learning finger numbers. My favorite ones are:

I’ve also created a set of flashcards to practice finger number recognition and placement on the keyboard. You can find it here.

Free iPad Apps
I own an iPad and and iPhone so I haven’t been able to try out the apps available for the Android platform, but here are my favorites for iOS users:

This is great for beginners to feel the beat internally when learning piano. Students have to wait for the count-off and tap the green button for the necessary duration. Each level has an accompaniment to make the exercises more interesting.

This app includes a few free songs and you can buy some more through the app. There are 15 “bots” and they each play a different pitch. When the player is ready to play the song, one bot will light up and raise its hand to let him know to touch it. It’s a fun version of a light-up keyboard. The app offers the option of having the bots sing the pitches on “la,” note names, or solfege syllables.

This is a bonus one. It’s a silly ear-training app to introduce tonal memory. There are three “blobs” and their “king blob.” The three blobs sing three different pitches and then the king blob will sing a pitch that matches one of the other blobs’; choose the correct one and move on to the next exercise.

Finally, the most important thing to keep your child excited about music is being excited about it yourself. Have fun during your practice sessions, be silly, and explore the instrument to ensure the joyous light of music remains lit in their hearts.

MarianaPMariana C. teaches piano, singing, and Spanish lessons in Des Moines, IA. She has a Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance from Shenandoah Conservatory and a Master of Music in Vocal Pedagogy at the Catholic University of America. Learn more about Mariana here! 



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5 Easy Piano Songs to Teach to Toddlers (with Videos!)

Easy Piano Songs To Teach ToddlersWhether you have a grand piano in your living room or a small electronic keyboard, you can teach your toddler how to play simple songs even if you don’t know much about music. Your toddler will love learning these five easy piano songs listed below.

Before you start, though, you’ll need to learn the location of the notes. Start by locating C – it’s the white key directly to the left of the group of two black keys. Using only the white keys, the notes continue in alphabetical order up to G, then restart at A. You may wish to label the keys with letter stickers or colors to make it easier for your child to learn.

Mary Had a Little Lamb

This simple song is typically one of the first songs that children learn when they are learning how to play the piano. This song has additional verses about the adventures Mary had with her lamb to keep the fun going while you sing and play this song.

Mary had a little lamb
Little lamb, little lamb
Mary had a little lamb
Its fleece was white as snow

Here’s a great video tutorial, showing all of the notes labeled:

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Your toddler will love playing this children’s classic on their piano. One of the great things about this song is that almost every note is played twice in a row, meaning there are fewer notes for your child to locate.

Twinkle, twinkle little star
How I wonder what you are
Up above the world so high
Like a diamond in the sky
Twinkle, twinkle little star
How I wonder what you are

Here’s a video tutorial from that we like:

If You’re Happy and You Know It

This song gives your little musician the chance to clap and dance while playing. The only tricky part of this song is the inclusion of B flat. This note is the small black key located directly between the A and B keys. If you are using a toy piano or xylophone, you may not have this key and may need to leave it out.

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands
If you’re happy and you know it,
A A Bb Bb Bb Bb D D
Then your face will surely show it
Bb Bb A A A G F F
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands

Here’s a helpful tutorial:

The Itsy Bitsy Spider

Children love singing this song and it’s pretty simple to play, too. One fun idea to try is for you to play the song while your child does the motions, then switch roles.

The itsy bitsy spider went up the water spout
Down came the rain and washed the spider out
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
And the itsy bitsy spider went up the spout again

Here’s a super-slow tutorial to follow along with:

Old MacDonald Had a Farm

This is another classic children’s song that your toddler will love playing over and over again to sing about every animal on the farm.

Old MacDonald had a farm
And on that farm he had a cow
With a moo moo here and a moo moo there
Here a moo, there a moo
Everywhere a moo moo
Old MacDonald had a farm

Here’s a tutorial for this easy piano song:

With these easy piano songs for kids, learning to play the piano will be tons of fun. If your child enjoys playing these songs, consider signing them up for private piano lessons! Not sure if your son or daughter is ready? Learn more about the best age for piano lessons here.

Learning to play an instrument is an amazing experience, and playing the piano specifically has tons of benefits for kids. Make it fun, show your support, and your child will have a great time learning!

Still want more? Here are 10 more of the best piano songs for kids!

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5 Games for Teaching Kids Piano

Games That Make Piano Learning For Kids FunPiano is considered an umbrella instrument, meaning, teaching kids to play piano helps them understand music more thoroughly, no matter what instrument they want to play later on. Even most singers first learn the basics of music theory and notation on the piano. Piano lessons at an early age lay out the basics of music-making in black and white (quite literally!). The great news is that you don’t need to know anything about playing piano to inspire your children to want to learn. Below are a handful of fun and easy games you can try out today to get them moving in the right direction. Using these homemade toys and games, you can make playing piano even more fun than sitting in front of a video game!

1. Mood Music

Kids instinctively know how to tell a story. When teaching kids piano, access this part of their young minds by asking them to think of a song to go with the mood of their favorite story. They can start by humming or singing melodies, or go straight to the piano and explore the keys! This will build their confidence in playing simple tunes and composing their own music.

2. Animals on the Keys

Most young kids enjoy learning the names of animals and the sounds they make. From the site Let’s Play Music comes a great suggestion that turns playing piano into playing with animal friends. On the octave starting with middle C, attach animal cartoons that begin with the letter corresponding to each note: Cat, Dog, Elephant, Frog, Giraffe, Ant, Bear. This makes it easier to remember which note is which. Now your child, like their elephant friend, will never forget!

3. Flash Memories

Have some fun with flashcards! For this piano game, create a set of cards covering an octave, with one piano key per card. Just write the name of the note on the back, and sketch out a visual representation of where the note is on the front. You can also make flashcards with notations, like clefs, key signatures, or tempo markings (like “andante”) for more advanced students.

4. A Keyboard for Little Feet

In the movie “Big”, Tom Hanks has to show adults how to have fun with a giant piano keyboard that he jumps on from note to note. Make your own keyboard rug out of construction paper or draw keys on an old white sheet, so they can “play” a tune with their whole bodies. Teaching kids piano concepts using physical play and allowing them to let out some steam helps them sit still later on during more concentrated lessons.

5. From A to G and Back Again

For kids who learn the alphabet through song, going backwards through a scale – G F E D C B A – can be confusing at first. But understanding these piano notes in a variety of orders is one of the main skills they will need to master for playing piano. To help them learn, use magnets or cut letters out of felt and help them rearrange the letters visually. You can also use these movable letters to lay out the notes for simple songs, like “Mary Had a Little Lamb.”


As kids progress through these games, you will learn what motivates them, as well as what areas need extra attention. In order for your child to truly excel, you may want to consider hiring a piano teacher at some point. For now, your  goal should be getting them get comfortable and eager to learn more. Teaching kids piano can be the most fun you have together as a family with these simple games that make music fun from the very beginning!

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Piano Lesson Books

Getting Started: 5 Wonderful Piano Books for Kids

Getting Started: 5 Wonderful Piano Books for KidsWhen a child begins playing piano, the first few months must be entertaining enough to keep them engaged, but educational enough that they feel they are making progress. There are many piano books for kids available, but a few provide the right mix of familiarity and challenges likely to keep your child’s attention. The majority of beginning piano books for kids include nursery rhymes and children’s songs, so finding a book that they can enjoy is easy. However, it is balancing this with less familiar music and new concepts that can prove to be the biggest challenge.

A Dozen A Day

Of all the piano books for kids, “A Dozen A Day” is going to be one of the most important. It is a series that will push your child’s knowledge a little further. The first book in the series introduces your child to all of the basics and puts it on a level that nearly anyone can understand. From the beginning of the first book, your child will learn how to hold their hands comfortably as they play the short pieces and scales. As your child progresses, you can purchase the next book in the series to keep them learning. The books are specifically designed as a way to warm up every day, and they really are a great help for all levels of players. Of all the piano books for kids, this is one that can progress with them for a while.

As your child reaches the more advanced books, they will get to play faster-paced songs. While the exercises can sometimes feel like a chore, with regular practice, your child will start seeing the progress they’ve made. A few minutes every time your child sits down at the piano can makes a huge difference in both their learning and comfort at the piano.

Alfred’s Basic Piano Library: Lesson Book Level 1A

This book is geared toward a child’s thought process, making it very useful when your child first starts playing. As the name suggests, it is for the absolute beginner. Because smaller hands often have trouble reaching complex fingerings, the book begins with simple rhythms. As your child gets comfortable stretching over the keys with one hand, they will progress into intervallic reading. The entire book is broken up into steps so that it is easy to determine when your child understands a concept and is ready to move to the next one. They will learn the layout of the keyboard and how the black and white keys are related. Finally, everything is pulled together into the grand staff. By the end of the book your child will be playing with multiple fingers on each hand, which can help give them a sense of accomplishment early in their playing.

Scales Bootcamp

Scales are part of the foundation for learning any instrument, but it’s especially true for piano. You may find that your child is resistant to spending time playing scales because they can feel more like work than play. When you think of the best musicians, you aren’t going to think of them playing scales – but every musician has learned them, and the best can actually make scales sound fun! “Scales Bootcamp” breaks down scales into easy-to-learn chunks, as three- and four-note blocks. This is actually one of the main advantages of learning piano; when you learn scales you generally learn to play multiple notes at a time, making it easier to remember which scales have which sharps and flats. The other focus of the book is making scales more fun. Whether playing with a different rhythm or adding another kind of twist, the book makes scales fun and memorable.

Bastien Piano Basics Primer Level – Piano

This book is entirely geared toward teaching children. From the graphics to the vocabulary, the book will help engage your child from the start. As such, it may not be recommended with a teenager or adult, because it may seem too childish. The book provides piano notation and a graphic of what key is being learned on the piano, alongside big print.

The book is divided into four levels with three keys in each level, so your child will understand the different keys by the end of the book. Like most beginner books, your child will learn one hand and clef at a time before diving into the grand staff.

Piano Adventures Lesson Book – Primer Level

This book is geared toward learning how to correlate notes to fingering, starting with middle C. Unlike a lot of beginner books, the pedal is incorporated into learning so that your child will understand early on how the pedal affects the sound. It also works to teach your child proper body posture, which is essential for playing the full length of the piano. After the child learns a few skills, there is a review to make sure they can put it all together. Of all the piano books for kids, this one is perhaps the most physically comprehensive, because it teaches about the entire body, not just the hands. By the end of the book, you child will know how to read basic sheet music in relation to the keyboard.

Maximizing Your Child’s Learning

While piano books for kids are great tools from day one, without private piano lessons, learning how to play is much more difficult. It can be overwhelming to think about handling both the harmony and melody of a song at the same time; a teacher can break everything down into manageable chunks, help your child focus on one or two key concepts, and direct them to the corresponding pages in their books to make practicing feel more like a game than a chore. An instructor will also give praise and guidance that is absolutely essential for keeping your child interested in playing.

With a great instructor and these piano books for kids, your child will be primed for success! Encourage your youngster to go far, and have fun!

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