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Becoming an Actor with No Experience: Is it Possible?

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Dreaming of making it big on screen or on stage, but worried you don’t have the right amount of experience? Read on as teacher Matthew H. shares his advice… 

 

While becoming an actor may seem extremely difficult in and of itself, without any experience it may even feel nearly impossible. However, what we often fail to realize is that the process alone of becoming an actor is filled with lessons that add to our overall experience and skill set. In fact, there’s actually no such thing as no experience when becoming an actor. Regardless if you choose to act as a hobby or have dreams to make it big as a working actor, here are some tips to refine your skills and get noticed.

First, let’s go over some basic definitions:

What is acting? This may seem obvious, but you have to have a clear understanding of what the art/craft/profession of acting is before embarking on any sort of career in the field. Many definitions exist, but some of the most prevalent ideas state that acting is “reacting to given stimuli” and “living truthfully under imaginary circumstances.” These viewpoints have been adopted by many conservatories and theater schools that teach diverse techniques by famous actors and directors such as Meisner and Stanislovski. With this understanding of acting, we can say that acting essentially is an extension of living.

Who are actors? Based on the above definition of acting, we all are actors. Everyone you encounter on the street is an actor. All people, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, social status, and so on necessarily are performing on a daily basis. We all react to stimuli in different ways, having to negotiate all sorts of situations in which we find ourselves. In fact, as individuals we are placed in multiple roles that we have to fulfill (son/daughter, coworker, friend, student), sometimes simultaneously. So rather than worrying about becoming an actor, we should focus more on tapping into the actor that is already inside of each of us.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s address the real question: how do you become successful as an actor? Well, the short answer is to just act. If you want to make it on Broadway or in Hollywood, then you’ll have to join the appropriate union (SAG, AE, etc.). Gaining membership is tricky, as these organizations have unique systems that require having performed in certain types of shows. The best way to overcome this is to find as many different opportunities as you can and audition. Do the community theater musicals, help your friends out with a role in their film class’ final project, make your own YouTube series, do whatever comes your way. This will give you the experience you need to hone in your acting skills, as well as create some visibility for yourself within the greater acting community. Someone may see you in a small, unpaid role and think that you’d be perfect in a larger production. In this regard, flexibility is an actor’s greatest asset.

While there is no one right way to become an actor, you cannot wait to “get discovered.” In fact, you have to go out of your way to make people notice you (for the right reasons), and then you will be one step closer to realizing your dream of becoming an actor.

MatthewHMatthew H. teaches a variety of subjects both online and in New Milford, NJ. He recently received his MA from NYU with a background in Sociolinguistics and related research. Learn more about Matthew here! 

 

 

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