Acting

Audition Monologues for Kids, Teens, and Adults: Every Actor’s Worst Nightmare!

Audition Monologues for Kids, Teens, and Adults: Every Actor's Worst Nightmare!Struggling to find that perfect audition monologue? It can take some time, so be prepared to be patient! Read on as Courtney P., one of our acting teachers in the Orlando area, offers her advice:

Let’s face it, most actors HATE monologues. They are tedious, and most of the time, it’s ridiculously hard to find the right one. Monologues are, however, necessary in the entertainment Industry, and many times your monologue can make or break an audition.

The process of perfecting your monologue can be long and drawn out, but working with an acting coach can really be beneficial. Many of my students have booked jobs, found an agent, or wowed audiences with their pieces. Finding and perfecting the right piece for you is crucial. Here are a few tips that can help you in your search:

1) Find the right piece for YOU:

The right monologue is out there, you just have to look. There are so many ways to find great pieces. Monologues from plays, TV shows, and films are all great places to start! The possibilities are endless. In many ways, monologues are like a great pair of  shoes. You have to try the monologue on for size. Does it fit your personality? Does it inspire you with ideas? Does it complement your skills? It has to be more personal than just Googling monologues and picking the first one you see. You should try out a few until you find the perfect one.

2) Make sure your monologue is age and situation appropriate:

This is a BIG one!  For children, there should be an age range of no more than one year younger and one year older. Adults can usually span about five years or so. As an adult, even if you look young, it’s not appropriate to use a teenage monologue, and likewise for kids/teens, stick to something close in age. As you’re searching for your audition monologue, keep in mind if you’re looking for monologues for kids, teens, or adults. The director can use their imagination if they need to consider you for a younger or older role.

Also, consider your audience when choosing a piece. Are you auditioning for a children’s theatre or family-friendly theme park ? An agency? A dramatic role in an adult play? As an actor you should have a few different pieces in your repertoire. A child-friendly monologue, a PG or PG-13 piece, and maybe something a little more heavy. Choosing the right monologue for the situation can really save you a lot of embarrassment and keep the casting director, director, or agent from feeling awkward.

3) Practice makes perfect:

Now that you or your coach has helped you find the right piece, you should really begin to explore the piece. Make strong choices, and think outside of the box.

You should try to keep your audition monologues fresh and rehearse them as much as possible, while continuing to add new pieces. Having a coach or qualified friend view your monologue and give notes is really important; often they can point out mistakes you’re overlooking or give constructive criticism.

Taking on the challenge of finding an audition monologue can be daunting, but once you find the right piece, you will flourish! Take the time to find complementary pieces for you. Make sure to practice often and keep adding new material! Happy hunting!

Courtney P.3Courtney P. teaches speaking voice, stage performance, and acting lessons in Winter Springs, FL. She specializes in TV & Film, Commercial and Stage Technique, and has worked with some of the industry’s top casting directors. Learn more about Courtney, or search for a teacher near you!

 

 

Interested in Private Lessons?

Search thousands of prescreened teachers for local and live, online lessons. Sign up for safe, affordable private lessons today!

Free TakeLessons Resource

 Photo by vancouverfilmschool

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>